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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Evening everyone.. I was curious if anyone had any suggestions on how to keep a baby from aspirating during feeding time. I have one female that during her last two feedings has started to aspirate while eating. Now, I think this is due to being fed with an eye dropper vs. a syringe (what I started with, but it broke). I will be getting more syringes when I go to work tomorrow (vet office), but I don't know what to do!

The first time, she actually stopped breathing, and I performed little ratty cpr on her, gently sucked/blew the milk from her nose/mouth and VERY gently squeezed her chest to get her going again, also put her in my hand with her head peeking out between two of my fingers and 'swung' her head down to get the fluids down. The second time, she was power sucking and I wasn't even squeezing the dropper. Did the same thing with her but this time she didn't stop breathing. I don't have access to any syringes until tomorrow morning, and we have at least 3 to four more feedings to go. Any suggestions?
 

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It's possible that it's already gotten into her lungs, which only a course of antibiotics will clear. When you are feeding her, at the very first sign of anything coming from her nose, stop, and let her sneeze/breathe it out. Obviously, try not to even let that happen... watch for when she stops sucking and stop pushing. If she starts to fall asleep while feeding, wriggle the nipple in her mouth a little. Hold the syringe such that you can stop the plunger the second you see a problem or she starts sucking too hard. And finally, when you are feeding her, do it somewhere quiet with no distractions... it's so easy to look up for a second because someone says something or something happens on the tv and before you know it she's stopped sucking and you didn't stop pushing. I'm not saying it's necessarily your fault, I think some babies are easier to aspirate than others, but those are the ones you can't afford to take your eye off for a split second.

I really would suggest you have her lungs checked by a vet, though.

By the way, my experience with this is in feeding baby squirrels. This one is a little older, but I took a picture of a colleague feeding one for my diary... this will give you an idea of how I mean about holding the syringe, for ease of stopping quickly... palm and fingers facing up with your index finger between the syringe and the plunger so you can stop it moving...



Typical that the part that I want to show you is out of frame a little, but I think it helps explain what I mean, still.

I hope this helps. Let us know how you get on.
 

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Doh! I just noticed... I missed where you said you are currently using an eyedropper! Absolutely, I think that is the problem... she's getting too much and you have no control over it. You really need to get those syringes... and her lungs checked ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
*nods* figured as much. Well, syringes are pretty easy to get ahold of since I work for a vet's office. Was going to talk to the vet I work with and have them check out anyways, as their poop isn't quite 'normal'. It's more green than mustardy (not sure if that's due to the formula/pedialyte or not), and they've gone from diahrea to constipation.

They're doing well though. The one doe has a slight tick in her chest, so she's definatly getting a good run through with the vet!
 
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