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I know on the internet everyone has a different opinion so I was hoping the knowledgeable members of RatForum might have a little insight on this. I know that the orange peels have D-limonene which can cause cancer in male rats and it isn't good for females either but I read somewhere in my uber research that the fleshy part of the oranges can actually reduce the chances of a female rat developing mammary tumors. Of course I found that tidbit on my phone and now that I'm trying to find the article again on the computer it seems to have disappeared into cyberspace so I can't site where I found my information. But has anyone else heard of this or actually used this risk reduction method with their girls? I bought a box of clementines last week and Mamma was trying to steal a section from me last night but I wouldn't let her because I wasn't sure of the risk. If there could be health benefits for the girls though, I'd love to share the sweet orangey goodness with them.
 

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Working in research, I feel like a lot of articles that claim protective or curative properties of food are misleading. If you're not reading the article from an actual science journal in its entirety, you can miss certain information. A lot of these studies are done with either extracted or artificial compounds that mimic the real thing used in a dose response on target cells. Problem number one is the fact that it's being applied directly to cells and is not being processed through organ systems like food consumption would. Another problem is that sometimes the amount that it takes of this concentrated substance is more than you could ever get by consuming the food containing it. Oxidative stress is a key cause of complications involved in diabetes. This is normally taken care of by naturally produced antioxidants in your body and many human trials have found that adding consumed antioxidants to diabetes treatments does not provide any quantifiable benefit even though you might think that adding more antioxidants would be beneficial. This is why labs are now focusing more on cell specific targeting to stimulate production of your body's natural compounds through gene therapy and such. Rambling aside, I would not trust that adding orange to your rats' diet would ward off cancer and there may be more risks involved than benefits (more sugar for example). If you do happen to find the study, let me know and I'll look through it and see if I can find other data that confirms the claim.
 
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