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Discussion Starter #1
So tomorrow, Rupert is booked into get his manhood taken firmly away from his. His aggression is getting worse and I want to try neutering as a last resort really (I've tried all sorts of behaviour training).

I just wondered, what are your experiences with neutering an aggressive lad? Did it help for you? How long did it take?

Also, does he have to be separated from the big boys till he heals or what? I'm unsure you see.
 

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No advice but just wanted to say good luck and I'm interested in hearing your experiences once his hormones settle. Hope it helps with the issues you've been having!
 

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Thank you! I hope it helps, otherwise I might have to try placing him with some girls, see if that helps! Ria will be thrilled hahaha.
 

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I've known and owned quite a few lads that were neutered for agression, typically it is straightforward and effective, though it can show up other issues either in your group or in the rat themselves.

In terms of what to expect, my typical neuter goes along these lines. Pick rat up from the vet, the lad is already awake and with it, haivng eaten a small amount before i'm aloud to pick him up. He will have been given metacam (pain reliever) as part of his surgery and i will get metacam and baytril (antibiotic) with him. His sack will generally look deflated, the wound should be neat and clean, sometimes there still seems to be stuff in there but its squishy, this is fat pads and feels different to if they left a testical in (which can happen). That night he gets his first baytril (i dont allow the vets to inject baytril) and if he seems in a lot of pain some metacam too. They go straight back in with there cage mates in most cases (unless the aggression was so bad they were seperated prior to neuter or they look really unwell and not with it) to a normal set up, but i make sure there is somewhere comfy to sleep with food and water on the bottom level. They get metacam daily in the morning for another day or two and baytril for a full course. I dont continue metacam for long as it enocurages them not to fuss the wound too much if it stings. Useually over the course of the next 3 - 4 weeks you notice the rats fur feeling softer, less tension in the body and generally less grumpyness. After a monht or two they often revert back to a more relaxed childhood state, somtimes getting playful or more cuddly. You ahve to watch there food intake carefully as they are prone to getting fat.

Complications
*Sometimes around 1 week after surgery you see or fell swelling around the area, this can be the sign that an infection is setting in, you need to then continue baytril until its settled back down again, it will useually come to a head and pop bfore healing and this is done faster with soaking and flushing.
*Sometimes along with the dropping hormones rat become more unsettled and can get more nervous, this is where there hormonal behaviour has been more of a front to cover there lack of confidence. This will useually settle with time and a good rat alpha, if not moving them into a hareem of ladies can be very popular.
* Sometimes after neutering an aggressor in a group you will find that another rat becomes a problem, this is because very dominant rats appear to supress the hormone levels of other rats in the group, take away that dominance and other people can cause issues. This can resolve on its own or with support or may need another neuter. You can sometimes also find that the same rat is getting picked on as before, in this case it may actually be the victim rat is the problem not the aggressor. Often they dont help themselves being defensive rather than submissive. Sometimes they are the ones that need neutering.
*Once over a year after neutering i had an abcess develop at the neuter site, this turned out to be a disolvable stich that had never quite disolved and one day the rats body had had enough of it. I dealth with it the same way as any abcess and it went away fone
*Occasionally a rat can react badly to surgery or the aneasthetic used, this can result in them dying in surgery or within the first 24 hours (the highest risk time). This is rare with neutering where the vet is using isoflorine gas, but some vets use other methods to knock out rats. If your vet has a good record of small animal operations, and ideally of rat castrations the risk of this is very low. If it does happen then it is likley to be becasue the rat was hiding a health condition such as a weak heart.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thats brilliant, thank you. I'm just hoping after time, we will settle down but if he doesn't (cross your fingers he does!!!), whats my next step? Are bucks less aggressive with does? I don't want to keep him solo, he loves playing :( I just feel very lost about the whole situation at the moment.
 

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Hey there, i got my boy Tyrion neutered earlier this year because he was aggressive and extremely territorial of his cage. He would puff up his fur if i came near and then bite if i dared but my hand inside. I couldn't get him out at all and getting him into the carrier to take to the vets was hard enough! He was only in the vets for a few hours and when i went to pick him up he was in the small cage i'd taken him in and seemed a little dopey still for the meds. We have to feed him metacam and baytril for a week or so after the operation. The scar for surgery was just a thin red line where his testicles use to be. His cage aggression stopped almost immediately although handling him was still a bit of an issue but immersion helped a lot with that and now he's my cuddliest lap rat!

As for cagemates, Tyrion's introductions with my male rats (before his surgery) went horribly. I'd already gotten him two female cage mates ready for when he healed up. You have to wait either two or three weeks after the operation (sorry i can't remember which!) because there could be some left over sperm and so the girls could still end up getting pregnant for a short while after the neutering. Once he was ready though, the introductions with Sansa and Khalee went very well. They live together absolutely brilliantly, he's very sweet with the girls even though there a bit younger and more energetic than he is.

Hope this helped, and good luck, i'd love an update once the surgery is over with. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks Jess!!! Thats really wonderful to know, I just hope everything goes okay. I panic when any of my babies are in the vets, I've seen broken hearts too many times :( I'm going to put him back with the lads to see if he's any better, if not in a couple months, I will find him some girls to charm. I want another SRS for Christmas anyways so he can go in with the girlies! Cross your fingers for me :D I will definitely keep this thread updated!
 

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Bucks and does get along easier, yes, so if post neuter he hasn't settled then girls are a good bet.
 

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Neutering is AMAZING!!! I recommend it for anyone having trouble with their boys. My neutered males are amazing. Charlie was aggressive and marked like crazy before. Now he is gentle and never pees!
 
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