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I have an extremely active female that is about 9 months old. She has no cagemates in with her but she lives above a neutered male in a double ferret nation. She fell off the top last night. She seemed a little stunned but was acting completely normal. I just had her out tonight. Her eyes are slightly closed and she is puffed up... but she is acting completely normal: eating, running on her wheel, climbing, and she ran around the room when I had her out. I gave her and Ollie nuts as a treat and she is scarfing them down. She doesn't appear to be injured. She is fine being handled.

Do I just keep an eye on her? What do I do?
 

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Hi,
I don't have any experience with falling rats but I do have experience with falling off horses! If she's acting OK and eating and drinking I'd just keep an eye on her. Possibly she is a little sore in her muscles (I know I ache after I fall off a horse even without injuries). Of course, if you're worried about anything I'd say take her to the vet to be sure, and especially keep an eye on her pee and make sure there's no red indicating internal injuries and bleeding. Also if she hit her head she may have concussion and a headache. Probably keep the light level low and observe.
 

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Give her a good check over, feeling and gentley moving all limbs (including neck and tail) and pressing lightly on all bones. Its likely that shes minorly sprained or bruised something in the fall but its important to check for anything more serious. I’d also watch her walking and check shes not favouring any of her legs or paws, it can be subtle but worth checking, Also take a look in her mouth to check her teeth are all still there and aligned.

If all these check out I’d just keep an eye on her for a few days, if she gets worse then I would take her to the vet for further check-ups as something may be damaged internally. Most rats are a bit subdued for a couple days then back to normal though. If she spends a lot of time bruxing, sitting hunched and fluffed up then you can put her on an anti-inflammatory (e.g. metacam, kids ibuprofen), but I tend to try and avoid this unless they are showing themselves to be seriously bothered by it, as a little bit of aches and pains helps stop them from using the sore bits (we feel pain for a good reason).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
An update:

I checked on her after an hour and it looked like she was retching. I took her to emergency and on the way, she was spitting up white fluid. The vet didn't see anything visibly wrong and she was starting to perk up. She has always been really thin but the vet seems to think she is a little underweight. The vet sent me home with Metacam (and a massive emergency bill :( )

Once I put her back in her cage, I realized she was choking. She grabbed a nut and shortly afterwards, she was rubbing her neck around the cage and spitting up liquid nut. I wasn't sure what to do. We got some water into her via syringe, which she eventually took, and did a quick search. The internet said to leave her and she will eventually get it out. If it didn't over several hours, the vet may need to intervene.

My boyfriend fed her this morning and she ate her food. She retched a little bit but she is looking a lot better. When I checked on her, she wasn't puffed up and was biting to get out of the cage. I gave her a treat and she retched a little bit. She looks 80% better than she early this morning but I don't think she's out of the woods yet.

I have some leftover Oxbow Carnivore care powder that you mix with liquid that help rats put on weight. I'm scared to give it to her now because I don't want it to make things worse.

Thanks for the advice. I appreciate it. If you have any more words of wisdom for me, I appreciate it.
 

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Rats choking tends to last a few hours at most. I would worry with this going longer. I doubt it's what you want to hear after an e-vet bill but I'd get her along and see if the vet can have a look down her throat, she may need sedating for this. The worry is either there's damage there or somethings stuck. In rarer cases they can have a throat tumour, thankfully I've only come across a very small number of them. If it's just damage the metacam is ideal but otherwise it may need any blockage removing surgically or if it's a tumour steroids may help you get a bit more time
 
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