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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I'm a first time breeder. I'm actually breeding mice, but the concept is the same. I've found as much information as possible and I've been considering it for about a couple of years now. Nonetheless, I am ready.

My question: I bought a male and female mouse from the pet store roughly a week ago. I'm wondering what the odds are of the female actually getting pregnant. Is it almost a positive idea that she'll be pregnant? Mostly I'm just excited and such seeing as it is my first time breeding, and I'm wondering if there's any sure way to tell.

I just switched cages (as the little male could escape) and finding the "plug" was something I found out you could do after the fact. Should I be patient and just wait until I can see the swelling or is there a sure way to tell if your mouse/rat is pregnant? Thanks.
 

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For Mice, If your Breeding Then Just leave the male in.
Its not like they will eat the babies. My Male Mice actually pick them up and move them to the mom.

The only Thing people should say to this is that they will contiue to try breeding....(the male)
 

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That's horrible advice for rats matt. If you leave the male in, the female will just get pregnate again putting strain on her while she feeds the current litter, causeing her to have undue stress and a shorter life span. DO NOT LEAVE THE MALE IN!

But yeah, I really don't think backyard feeder breeders should be giving out any advice on PET breeding when the person strives to do it properly. I know that sounds harsh but really, please don't give out advice on breeding Matt.

That being said, I don't know much about mice at all but I know for rats it's really discourged to breed unknown genetics from petstores as you don't know what you are going to get. Any breeder of any animal strives for health and temprement first, and doing that you want to know what you are breeding. So I don't know if there are dedicated mouse breeders with pedigrees but that might be something you want to look into.
 

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Why are you breeding?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Forensic said:
Why are you breeding?
To gain experience and out of love for the animal.

Poppyseed, thank you for the advice. And don't worry, everything I looked up told me not to leave the male in as he will eat/kill the babies or get the female pregnant while she's nursing.

However, my question still remains if there is a way to tell for sure if the mouse is pregnant.

Oh, and I assure you that the mice are healthy and that the pet store is very reliable, so no need to worry. ;)
 

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What are you going to do with the baby mice, then? Have you funds if something goes wrong?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Forensic said:
What are you going to do with the baby mice, then? Have you funds if something goes wrong?
Keep most, then others given away. I already know people who would want them.

Funds, yes.

However, I'm not asking for people to give me a responsibility lecture.
 

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We're not trying to lecture. We are just concerned for all animals involved. Using known genetics is the way to go because you don't know what problems you could be introducing into the babies. A good breeder breeds to improve the animal, not just because they like them.

Why didn't you get a pair from a breeder and apply for someone to be your mentor? It isn't difficult, or costly. And I am sure there are good breeders near enough to you.

Did you look for homes before breeding, or did you rely on knowing people who would take them and not look for other adopters? If so, that's really not the way to do it. Strting a list before you put them together is best.

How old is the female? I don't know a lot about mouse breeding, but my experience with petstores is that they are very young. Young mothers are more apt to develope problems.
 

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Don't breed petstore mice, it's just as bad a breeding petstore rats.

Unknown genetics, as mentioned by Rodere, can produce unwanted mutations that may cost the babies their life and continuing those genetics will just further the mutations.

It would be best and wisest to have a good breeder as your mentor, and then take a breeding pair from their stock to start your own lines.

Also, while we are not trying to lecture, responsibility is a large part of breeding. That includes lining up possible homes for the future babies BEFORE you breed the parents.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Good lord in heaven.

I didn't buy from a breeder because the petstore <i>has</i> a breeder who works there. One of the mice is a black self, the other a chocolate self, so they aren't just "Feeder" or "petstore" mice. I did carefully choose them, and I'm not stupid about it or anything.

Not only that, I've been spending most of my time researching breeding mice, taking care of the babies, finding homes, etc. I have everything planned out and taken care of ahead of time. Therefore, this is <b><i>not the advice I am looking for.</b></i>

Ugh, the **** with this topic. Right after this I'm going to get another "Are you physically and emotionally ready? Do you have the funds? Why are you so stupid?"
 

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MagicalLobster said:
Ugh, the **** with this topic. Right after this I'm going to get another "Are you physically and emotionally ready? Do you have the funds? Why are you so stupid?"
Maybe, Maybe not. They say this because they dont want anymore mice or rats to be left homeless or unwanted and mistreated.

I know that I received much of this also because of breeding but I am learning from it.
 

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MagicalLobster said:
Good lord in heaven.

I didn't buy from a breeder because the petstore <i>has</i> a breeder who works there.
Be aware that, not only is this a rat forum, but petstore rats/mice/whatever are typically poorly bred animals. Have you talked to the breeder? Are they reputable and do they care about the fate of their animals? Have you been able to check out the breeding area and the conditions of the cages? There are a lot of questions to ask to see if a breeder is a good breeder to get a breeding pair from.

MagicalLobster said:
Not only that, I've been spending most of my time researching breeding mice, taking care of the babies, finding homes, etc. I have everything planned out and taken care of ahead of time.
All of this is very good. It's not often people will bother with this kind of stuff.

MagicalLobster said:
Ugh, the **** with this topic. Right after this I'm going to get another "Are you physically and emotionally ready? Do you have the funds? Why are you so stupid?"
Look, we don't go out scouting for places to start trouble, these are just our first reactions to breeding and we want to be reassured you know what you're doing before we help you futher yourself in the breeding process.

Please do not be so quick to temper, that kinda of reaction has started many troublesome threads in this forum and we'd like to keep it to a minimum. :)

(Edited for typos)
(Edited again for typos)
 

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When you are given great information, run with it, don't take it so personally. Everyone did the same thing to me when I had bred my petstore rats. Guess what? The mom died in labor on the way to the emergancy room! Her babies where deformed and already dead inside her. So I vowed never to breed again.

Now I just take in mom ratties with their babies from other people who are not properly feeding or housing them. I provide proper care. Then I try and find them loving homes.
 

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MagicalLobster said:
Ugh, the **** with this topic. Right after this I'm going to get another "Are you physically and emotionally ready? Do you have the funds? Why are you so stupid?"
How old are you? Eight? :roll:

We're trying to make sure you understand what you're getting into. In case you hadn't noticed, this is the internet. We don't know you or the situation. So we ASK. :)

I've heard a lot of stories about first time inexperienced breeders who were so sure they'd have an easy time and plenty of homes and then the money and homes vanish.
 

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I read that article and...well...this one paragraph is bull.

Can I keep a male mouse with my female when she has babies?

If a male mouse is left in with a female when she has her young a few things might happen. He may kill the babies.............

He may also kill them because he is jealous. Sometimes a male will kill the babies because he feels that they are taking the moms attention away from him............

It has been reported that a female mouse can abort her babies if she smells another male mouse...............

A Male will not kill the babies unless there is TOO many mice currently in the cage. (Sadly...From experience...I know...)
The only reason to remove the male is that you dont want them to get pregnant right after she gives birth. Seeing as Females Can get pregnant up to 3-4 hours after giving birth.

Besides not wanting another litter of mice...the male could stay with the female.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank you for the link. Fortunately, that was one of the sites I had read anyway and found to be, well, different than the others.

Sorry I got so short tempered, it's just that I didn't post it to have people asking me all these questions about whether I did this or that. The answer is yes, in that I did think everything through at least 10 times and made sure everything is going to work out.

As for the breeder, I know her fairly well and this pet store is very top of the line. I don't want you to think it's petco or anything (had some mistreatment of animal incidents there multiple times which is why I use petco. Generally it's the franchise petstores that do poor jobs with animals, correct? That's what I've heard anyway). It's actually a personal business run by a rodent breeder, who I know for a fact cares deeply about even the individual mice. She had to kiss them goodbye before she gave them to me. ;)

Thanks for the advice, but I'm not looking for people to tell me that I shouldn't do this or that providing that the stereotypes for most petstores are that they are bad and mistreat animals. The mice are healthy, they are fancy mice, and I have a good feeling about the babies.

All I want to know is if there's a simple way to tell if the female is pregnant. I'm pretty sure I found what appears to be the plug as it turns out, still intact in the females vagina, so obviously the mating happened recently (or it's just a stubborn plug). Thanks.
 

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Also, you shouldn't leave the male in there if you don't want to risk him killing and eating the babies. The mother is also more likely to eat the babies if she gets pregnant again or has the male harassing her to impregnate her again. Stress can be a factor in them killing their offspring.

A good breeder provides pedigrees with their mice. My local pet store had fancy mice. You know what? It was just a pretty word for feeder bred mice that looked pretty. And their 'ugly' aka PEW and less pretty siblings were labeled snake food. So they were still just feeders genetically. A good breeder also does not sell their animals in a pet store.

The cardinal rule of good reputable breeding is starting from good stock with known lines and with a mentor. Bottom line.

You still never answered why you didn't get any directly from a reputable breeder and possibly a mentor. Every animal in a pet store almost always comes from a breeder. That doesn't make it a good or reputable breeder, even if they are employed at that store.

If you are researching in the right places, it will say more or less the same thing we are.
 

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MagicalLobster said:
All I want to know is if there's a simple way to tell if the female is pregnant. I'm pretty sure I found what appears to be the plug as it turns out, still intact in the females vagina, so obviously the mating happened recently (or it's just a stubborn plug). Thanks.
If they're anything like rats the signs will only be weight gain, change in temperament (sometimes), and nesting behavior.
 

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Ethical breeders WON'T sell to pet stores if they are in it for the right reasons. Selling to a pet store means you CAN'T keep track of the lines, you can't find out if there are health problems, etc. You also don't have any control over where your [rats/mice/whatever] end up. There's no adoption contract and no idea if they end up as feeders.

Most rodent fanciers ARE going to react badly to what you're doing, because any "breeder" selling to a pet store or selling "breeders" to people they have not mentored is NOT in it for the right reasons (improving lines, etc).
 
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