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What can a vet do if the rat has cancer? I heard when rats start to go downhill there's very lil hope for recovery. What can the lumps be other than cancer? When at Petco I was looking at the rats and thought of getting three, then saw two others in a lil den, in the same tank. So I was thinking it's just $25 for five, but the odds are at least one of these rats will be lumpy. Do Vet consider rats as exotics and charge more?
 

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Yes vets consider them as exotics but don't always charge more. My vet charges half price for rats on everything office visit, meds, surgery.

Males rarely get lumpy due to cancer some times it is just masses sometimes they are abscesses. Abscesses are very treatable at home I have treated MANY with a great amount of no recurrences. I have never lost a rat to am abscess that I treated either.

Females are far more likely to get mammary tumors. Females have about an 80% chance of getting them. My vet charges $40 for the removal of a mass. If you get them spayed however their chances go down to about a 4% chance. If they have a litter it lowerrs the chances as well but by no means does that mean you should breed!!!

Also diet helps ALOT if you feed them crap like KayTee stuff they are WAY more likely to get cancer because of the perservatives they use. I always feed haarlan teklad 2014 and a dry mix i make myself and then fruits and veggies and leftovers (i spoil the crap outta my ratties)
 

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Stephanie said:
Females are far more likely to get mammary tumors. Females have about an 80% chance of getting them. My vet charges $40 for the removal of a mass. If you get them spayed however their chances go down to about a 4% chance.
I think my vet would disagree with those figues Stephanie, were did you find them?
 

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ladylady said:
Stephanie said:
Females are far more likely to get mammary tumors. Females have about an 80% chance of getting them. My vet charges $40 for the removal of a mass. If you get them spayed however their chances go down to about a 4% chance.
I think my vet would disagree with those figues Stephanie, were did you find them?
I can't remember the site off hand but I will look it up again if it was even on the web LoL. I have gathered so much info it is scary. I have things printed out from sites that no longer exist, books, vets offices, vet techs i know, and the rescue I volunteer for. I will try and track down the info again but no promises as to wether i can find the website.

:EDIT: here is one site i based some info off of rat tumor info
 

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Yeah i couldn't find that yet lady lady LOL i am still looking it may have just been in a conversation I have had with some other volunteers and they told me thie info but i will try and find something to back it up. I do know that the percentage drops dramatically when the rat is spayed or has a litter. (don't breed just to save on tumor costs)
 

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Most lady rat owners would rather wait just in case their girl ends up not getting mammary tumours. Or they cannot afford it (I pay over 200 Cdn for spays here).
OR they have issues putting a healthy animal through surgery, whereas most females will get a mass, and the removal cost is usually quite a bit more, plus the rat is older and their health is usually compromised.

I have heard the fallacy that a rat that has had a litter is less likely to get a tumour. I just don't understand that since these tumours are hormone-driven.
 

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It is because a rat that gives birth is a normal rat it is what they are meant to do. A female rat's horomones coincide with this and if they don't give birth something goes wrong in how they absorb the horomones and what not.
 

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Stephanie said:
It is because a rat that gives birth is a normal rat it is what they are meant to do. A female rat's horomones coincide with this and if they don't give birth something goes wrong in how they absorb the horomones and what not.
Not quite sure I can agree with this. This is also what humans are meant to do, have babies.

Do we have a higher rate of tumors when there's no pregnancy? No, because you don't produce pregnancy hormones if you aren't pregnant (well, baring certain things).

They likely have a high rat of tumors due to a short life being extended, high mutation rate, and significant in-breeding (necessary to 'tame' them. Same thing with increasing human life.)
 

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lilspaz68 you're from my area aren't you? I've seen you in other forums from Quebec. If you are where is your vet located? I'm having a hard time finding a good one for my girlies...
 

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renay said:
lilspaz68 you're from my area aren't you? I've seen you in other forums from Quebec. If you are where is your vet located? I'm having a hard time finding a good one for my girlies...
Sorry Renay, You have seen me on RS (mod there), and possibly ONRMCA (but not much anymore), but I am from Toronto. You should post on CRA (Canada Rat Adoption by Yahoo) that you are looking for a good vet in your area. Small Victories Rodent Rescue in Montreal is run by Jane Sorenson as well as the CRA board (she is getting out of it but handing it over to another woman in the area). They might have a better idea.
 

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Stephanie said:
It is because a rat that gives birth is a normal rat it is what they are meant to do. A female rat's horomones coincide with this and if they don't give birth something goes wrong in how they absorb the horomones and what not.
I need to see your resources on this. I think its another rumour that's similar to "your dog will calm down after she has had a litter".

I checked online and rat resources and its not supported.

from ratguide.com's article on tumours this is what they came up with for prevention of tumors.
· Prevention
· Offering a diet that is nutritiously low in fat, calories , amines and nitrates, is recommended.
· Spaying may be recommended for prevention.
· Early detection of the tumor while the growth is still small decreases operative time, enhances recovery period, and improves outcome.
 
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