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Let me begin with saying that I am a new rat owner. My first rat is named Yeti, so you know. So, let’s start at the beginning. I have always wanted to take care of an animal, so I decided on a rat, did a ton of research, and got him. Yeti is a dream come true. He is a rescue, and was treated poorly before he was rescued. He was kept in a cage the size of a shoe box, was alone, had lice, and was starving. This brings me to what is worrying me. The rescuer said he hates other rats and I don’t know if it is because of hormones or something else. He seems to be acting normal and loves attention, but, as this is my first rat, I don’t know what normal is. So I want some advice. Is there a way to introduce aggressive rats safely, without getting them fixed or something along those lines. I have just read that they should never be kept alone, and I am really worried. Thank you so much for reading this, and for anyone who gives me advice.
 

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Let me begin with saying that I am a new rat owner. My first rat is named Yeti, so you know. So, let’s start at the beginning. I have always wanted to take care of an animal, so I decided on a rat, did a ton of research, and got him. Yeti is a dream come true. He is a rescue, and was treated poorly before he was rescued. He was kept in a cage the size of a shoe box, was alone, had lice, and was starving. This brings me to what is worrying me. The rescuer said he hates other rats and I don’t know if it is because of hormones or something else. He seems to be acting normal and loves attention, but, as this is my first rat, I don’t know what normal is. So I want some advice. Is there a way to introduce aggressive rats safely, without getting them fixed or something along those lines. I have just read that they should never be kept alone, and I am really worried. Thank you so much for reading this, and for anyone who gives me advice.

Let me start by saying that while rescues are wonderful - their view on an individual rodent is sometimes skewed, for a lot of different reasons. I've gotten rats from rescues and had them act very different than what I expected, once they got use to me. So, there's that.

The difficulty comes in where you don't necessarily know how any given rat will act towards any other given rat - without trying to introduce them. At that point, you've already invest time and money into the newcomer. So if your rat ends up not liking other rats - you now have 2 rats and 1 of them still needs a cage-mate. That being said, it really isn't a good idea for a rat to be solitary, unless they really are that difficult to put with other rats. (I'm currently facing the potential of this with my most recent girl from a rescue).

So, first, get your rat healthy and good to go.
While that's happening, start seriously thinking if you're ready to own two or three rats.
If your good with all that - start looking for your next rat. With mine - I try to keep newcomers a bit younger than my oldest girl. But in your case, maybe an older one would be able to better hold their own.
You will need a separate cage for a new rat. Even if the new rat is from a rescue that swears they quarantined - you'll still want to keep your new rat separate for a while. It gives you and the new rat a chance to get to know each other and for your current rat to get use to having a new rat scent around.

There's a entire stage and process to introducing rats - and once you have one - it's all pretty easy to handle and look up. There are literally entire threads about it, here.

Good luck.
 

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It's a bit of a tough situation to be in as a brand new rat owner. I always recommend purchasing/adopting rats in bonded pairs for this very reason. Going through an introduction process with a potentially problematic rat can be a challenge for experienced rat owners. I'd suggest doing lots of research.

Personally, I'd attempt to integrate him into a group of rats by purchasing 2 or 3 already bonded rats. I would be prepared for a potentially long intro process and for the possibility that it may not work. In the end, I might be stuck with two separate cages and rats that just can't be integrated.
 

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"I'd attempt to integrate him into a group of rats by purchasing 2 or 3 already bonded rats. "

That's an excellent suggestion!
 
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