Rat Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have four female fancy rats living together. They're very friendly and adjust well to strange rats - I successfully moved two of them in as pups after I'd had the original two together for several months. I like to give them play dates with my neighbor's fancies, as well as my roommate's rabbit, under close supervision, and they get along fine.

However, my friend just got two female soft-furred (or natal, I guess they're called) rat pups. Once they're grown up and trained, will it be possible to introduce them to my fancies? I know they'll grow up smaller than brown rats. Their cages are next to each other now, and they don't seem frightened. I'm just wondering if anyone here has tried introducing these two species. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,755 Posts
i was not aware that there were different species of pet rat other then the gambian and emin, but the last two are illegal in north america. and i always thought the word natal just meant baby...

pet rats will have different types or standards but they are all the same species. like a rex will have curly hair and a dumbo will have ears on the side of the head rather then on top. there are softer haired and coarse hair and many different colors and markings. are you sure she doesn't just have another type?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,755 Posts
i'll look into them then. i really can't tell what they would be like with fancies. heck, i didn't even know they existed until now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I found out about them like two days ago, when they turned up at the local pet store. They're very soft and cute, but kind of bitey. :\ I hope they'll be hand-trained soon - my friend is good with little animals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,641 Posts
From what I have heard they are very skittish, and bitey as you put it. Not cuddly like our regular domestic rats. I have seen some live with domestics but its not suggested at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,535 Posts
I've seen some cases of the two species together, but the soft-furred rats are much more wild and I'd worry about them, if not scrapping with, then teaching your rats bad habits.

Personally I'd leave them apart. They're different species, which can often lead to trouble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,195 Posts
They sound adorable! I want some! But not really, I have enough pets. Sounds like they're not cuddly at all- Sevilla jumped up on my shoulder for the first time today, it just melted my heart. I'd hate to not have that in a pet.

I would definitely keep them apart, though. Reading through that page it sounds like they're tiny and timid, and eat mostly seeds and grasses, definite prey critters. Rats are predator critters, and the natal rats would probably come off the worse for that encounter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,160 Posts
don't put them together, even for play-dates as you call them, supervised or not

They are bitey, they weren't really introduced in pet stores as pet quality animals. They are easy breeders with large litters & widely used in a different community of pet people.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I raise ASF Rats (african soft furred), aka Natal rats or Multimammate mice. I also raise and breed reptiles so I am sure I will not be welcomed with warm hearts, but my goal is not to incite an argument or troll the forums, instead I just want to clear up some confusion...

ASF rats are more like a large mouse in appearance and personality. I think of them more as an "African soft furred mouse". They are not as social as a normal domestic rat and they are a bit more flighty, but consider the fact that all of the ASF Rats in the US were imported and bred for reptile food. If you were to raise one has a pet, it would be a bit different.

I raise mine on a mix of high protein dogfood, pellets, mixed seeds (sunflower, millet, etc) and are given treats of fresh fruit. They are raised in a rack system (as most rodents raised by reptile breeders are), but they are held, socialized, and not at all bitey. I have 50 breeders and they NEVER bite me. If you pick them up by the tail they can get scared and bite, but if you just scoop them up in a cupped hand they are fine.

Anyways, my reason for posting is to let you know that ASFs are not "naturally" bitey. Buy or obtain one from someone who has tame ASFs and raise yours as pets and you will not be happier!

Here is a short video clip showing me pick one up with one hand (camera in the other) and petting it with thumb. Notice it's not biting me.. :p

http://www.siscoreptiles.com/rodent/100_3664.MOV

Don't just assume they are all bitey, I would love to see these become more common in the pet trade instead of living a life with the sole purpose of being just food.

Rick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,160 Posts
it would be very difficult to do as you suggested because in these here parts the reptile breeder is just as dreaded as the breeder of all things furry. Very few "breeders" are recognized as those who are worthy of doing so.

So you see because of this... you can see how it would be very difficult to find a breeder of these small furry... it is nearly impossible to find a breder of the more commonly sought after rats.

Thank you for your info though. I have had many pets over the years that have a bad rep of being bitey, aggressive or not a proper species to become a pet... the thing is, with patience & proper handling many animals can be friendly pets.

My final word on the subject, don't go sticking your hand in a cage to test the theory of whether these little nippers are friendly or not. The ones that are nippy go for the bone!!!
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top