Rat Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi

We have chickens and we just spotted a Japanese Black Hooded Rat that has a hole (burrow) in the ground and is making trips back and forth to the chicken feed. We have no 'barn rats' that we know of. We live in Northeast Pennsylvania and we don't want to trap and release it since it is domestic. Local pet stores are not interested and I don't want to take it to the spca!

Does anyone know what we should do? Would it harm the chickens? Is it dangerous to humans since it is living outdoors?

Thanks for anyone's help.

Marc M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
A japanese black hooded rat? The only rat that comes in the hooded variety is the brown rat (rattus norvegicus) which is the rat that's commonly kept as a pet and lab animal. If you don't want to trap and release or take it to a rescue then i'm not sure what you could do. Certainly taking it to a rescue seems like it would be the best option. You could stop it from getting into the corn and hope it goes away though I think that might be unlikely seeing as it has already dug itself a burrow. All wild animals are potentially dangerous to humans. If the rat you're seeing has come into contact with any wild rodents then it is possible that it could have caught something from them. Honestly though the rat by itself poses little threat to you and your chickens, the poor thing is probably scared (if it is domestic). I do think taking it to a rescue would be best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
581 Posts
I searched up the term and from what I gathered a "japanese" hooded is just a way to describe hoodeds. I read an article that gave the history on it:
"Through the years the hooded has had many names. In the beginning it was known as “Even Marked.” In 1915 this was changed to “Japanese,” and in 1957 to “Japanese Hooded,” a name which still crops up from time to time today. The N.F.R.S. Standards called them “English Hooded” in 1976, and by 1977 they were simply refereed to as “Hooded.” AFRMA has always recognized this variety as “Hooded.”

I agree, the rat should be caught and brought to the rescue. It has built a burrow, which is pretty good and it could probably live outside if it's gathering food and such, but it would be better to return it to human contact, I think. I don't believe it will cause problems with your chickens, but if it is a domesticated rat then is may be more friendly towards people and be more inclined to go near them. If it has encountered wild animals and gotten a disease or anything, this could be troublesome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
Oops nevermind! I had no idea they referred to the hooded variety as "japanese rats". Good luck with your predicament!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
952 Posts
Well do you have a local rat rescue? Try them. There are humane traps that you can use and then relocate him to a shelter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thank you for your time and your post! I do think the rescue would be the best, however I fear the few rescues in this area may not take rat-a-tat. I will call every one I can find.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for answering my post. No, there is unfortunately no rat rescue in N. E. Penna. Most of the folks around here would rather shoot or poison them. But I will be calling all the animal rescues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
581 Posts
Okay. The forum appreciates the time and effort you are taking in order to get this rat to safety. Thank you very much! If you don't find any rescues, you may want to put an add on some sort of petfinder or something similar and see if anyone claims the little rattie. I'll be honest though, I'd say that he rat is more likely abandoned and not lost. It's worth a try though. Putting a few flyers out in the rescues or shelters in the area might be a good idea too, just to spread the word a bit. :3
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top