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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello! It's story time I guess. I just wanted to say I know this is long but this is a situation I haven't heard or seen before.
I saw that you have to post three times in this section to post in other places and I want to tell my story anyway cause I have so many questions and feel I should tell you all the whole story.
Muridae Rat Degu Rodent Gerbil Purple Rat Violet Chinchilla Muridae
This is Wilber. I meant to name him after the rat from Charlotte's web but wilber came out and it stuck. Wilber was almost literally dropped in my lap. Well I found him under the couch moments after I heard a sqeak in the living room. See my Grandma had a gimpy cat and when she passed away from cancer I told her I would take care of the cat. She has never really caught mice that I know of, so of course what she brings me is a baby whose eyes aren't even open. Now I don't know where he came from and can't put him back anyway cause of my smells on him now. and I can't just release him. When I realized his eyes weren't open but he was the size of a small mouse I was fairly certain at that moment I had a baby rat. I had to make a decision so I ran to the nearest pet store that was open on a 6:30pm and took the half hour drive with him to ask as much as I could. I read and looked up caring for baby rats. And used puppy formula feeding him every 2 hours with a paint brush (for some reason that worked great).

3 or 4 days after I got him his eyes opened and I was the first thing he saw. As he got older I saw that I didn't have to wake up as much as I was at night to feed him and we got in a schedule. At first I didnt know if i would keep him. I mean I have cats and was never like "lets get a rodent!" But now after almost a month him and I are super bonded to each other. When he gets scared he runs right to me. the two times he has gotten loose in the room he has jumped right into my hand when i found him.

Product Table Cage Furniture Floor Cage Room Furniture Net Pet supply I built him a cage cause my husband is in alaska fishing and he isn't happy about Wilber. So i didn't want to spend too much money.

I did bring him to the vet tho. I was worried that she would tell me to release him but the tip of his tail had gone flat about 5 days to a week after I got him and it shriveled up and I also wanted to ask her a bunch of questions. To my surprise she said that releasing him would be a death sentence. So now I have a VERY tame wild rat. I am 95% sure he is a norway. I live in washinton state and that's what we have and he fits the description from what I have looked up.

I have a walk-in closet with lenoleum I want to make into a room for him.

Fawn Tail Ear This is Wilber a month after I got him.

Now for the dilema. Firstly is a walk-in closet ok? doesnt he need like real light. It a great place cause its in my room and I can not only close the closet from the cats but I can close the room off if I need.

Secondly and more importantly. Getting a second rat.... my husband isn't happy I have Wilber. He hasn't met him and I know cause like all of our other animals (ie. chickens cats and dogs) he will probably love Wilber as much as I do but he is a grump by nature. Also Wilber is "wild" and by my best guess he is 5-6 weeks old he isn't clipped and I am not sure if getting him fixed is a good idea or not. Would he be too mean to a new rat? The ALWAYS keep rats in pair thing has me so worried that I spend aleast 4-6 hours a day with him. He has been running around my from my head to his cage while I paint or do whatever but I love him so much now I am worried about him having a friend.

Anyway I won't take up anymore reading time but I really need advice, or confermation, or encouragement? Anything would help. Thx
 

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All rats are individuals, so my own experience may not be appropriate for Wilbur... But I'll try and help....

First wild rats don't generally like or bond with people... they bond with one person or one family. My 5 year old daughter could squish out part wild rat into doll clothes and toss her around like a rag doll, but when a stranger grabbed her he got seriously torn up... Wild rats can be very carefully be introduced to strangers... slowly... and with their human friend providing emotional support, but never let strangers care for him or handle him unsupervised or very bad things might happen... He will become your very best friend and even defend you, but he's never likely to trust humans in general. And when wild rats go ballistic watch out. Our part wild girl also liked to kill mice and small animals, likely she would have eaten them while she lived outdoors for 5 months... but she attacked them on sight so keep her away from other small pets. She apparently also chased the wild cats out of our yard.. not that she could kill one, but she was fast and tore flesh and nothing messed with her, we recovered her stealing food from and hanging out with our neighbors pit bulls.

She was about 7 months old when we got her back and we already had another rat, the intro went quickly but wasn't easy. Our domestic rat was much larger and kept pushing her around and power grooming her until one day they were best friends, we woke up to find two neat incisions around our domestic rats trachea... and the fight over who was in charge was forever over. Our wild rat made her point, she could have easily killed our bigger domestic rat, but she didn't, she just wanted peace... after that the two were inseparable. Wild rats and domestic rats can be friends.

Most rats prefer a dark and cramped home, but they also like to free range a lot. Our rats prefer to live in or under an old metal cabinet, that's where they build their nests and sleep, but they free range the house all day and most of the night. In the wild, wild rats have territories that include several burrows and several acres from where they gather food and find water. Our part wild rat was spotted by neighbors several blocks away during her "patrols" when she was outdoors and she was recovered on the second floor of a neighbors house. Although our home was the epicenter of her activities, she ranged far and wide for food and water... Likely, she was stealing food from neighbors houses, killing small animals and foraging for disgusting things in the great outdoors... I will admit when we got her back she was in perfect health and didn't have a hair out of place... but she did stink like pit bull.

Yes, you can get Wilbur a domestic friend, 6 weeks might be a good age to do it... supervise the intros carefully and Wilbur will make a really amazing friend to you moreso than a pet. He's likely to be a bit aggressive during play, but not likely to bite you and he's likely to enjoy slinking around in the shadows like our part wild rat did... He's also likely to become a great jumper and climber.

As to neutering, it's generally not necessary as long as you keep working with him and keep him involved with you as his alpha or parent. This is not the kind of animal you can neglect or mistreat. And if he ever gets pushy, push back hard and fast. Mostly, keep him away from strangers unless you are supervising him and keep him away from small animals... Pretty much think of him as a very friendly pet wolf and you should be just fine. As long as he loves and respects you, you have a best furry friend for life, screw up that relationship at your own risk...
 

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Wow nelyn! This was really such a nice read! your baby looks adorable I hope you find a friend for Wilber soon :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replys. And for all the info Rat Daddy. I still have the issue of my husband which is the biggest for me. I really don't want him to get mad. And he will if I get another rat. For now I will do as much research as I can and start to REALLY set the closet up for Wilber. I have a buncha cardboard boxes I am gunna start with and I just made my first rat hammock.
Pattern
 

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Remember if Wilbur doesn't know hubby, he's a stranger and you will need to supervise intros very closely... hubby should talk to Wilbur first then let Wilbur sniff him and when Wilbur shows friendly interest gently pet him... You are going to have to reassure Wilbur that hubby is a friend and part of the family at first. Just like domestic rats, and even moreso wild rats are pack animals, members of their pack are family and every other rat is an invader... Wilbur will need to learn that hubby belongs in his house when he gets home. And getting torn up by a wild rat doesn't make for much of a good impression from a guy's perspective.

I know it's hard to believe that Wilbur is really a dangerous wild animal, I noticed that all of the feral cats moved away from our house when our rat was living outside, but we were joking that our rat was driving them away, when we didn't really know she was even still alive, but when she shredded my neighbor's hand and arm when he tried to catch her for us, it was a real wake up call... Luckily he was special forces just back from Iraq and he didn't like doctor's or hospitals or stitches and refused to go to the emergency room and explain to anyone a rat got the best of him or that would have cost me big... Wild rats bond so closely with their pack and human family that they actually can appear to be more docile and friendlier than pet rats. There was a fellow here that posted under "unlikely father" who had a wild male rat that almost never got off his shoulder. Humans who develop such a special bond, like we had with our part wild rat, really get a most remarkable friend, but always remember Wilbur is a wolf and not a dog. He's faster, stronger and more agile than any domestic pet rat. He can squish almost flat to slide under doors, he can jump like a squirrel and he can practically run up walls... And when he goes into self defense mode he'll tear flesh...

I honestly believe that if you take good care of Wilbur and manage him properly you will never see his vicious side because he will be such a good friend to you and your family... like I said, I had no problem letting my 5 year old play unsupervised with our wildling... but you always have to keep the implicit danger Wilbur can present to strangers in the back of your mind. Oddly when we did take our wild child out with us, people would often ask if she bit, and we would say yes she does, and they wanted to pet her anyway... So we did the talk, sniff and touch routine and as long as I was holding her she was fine and even friendly... but I was on pins and needles and ready to fall back fast if she looked even the slightest bit agitated. She really was a great rat, one of the very best we ever lived with, but always remembering she wasn't really a pet is what kept everyone safe. It's so easy to forget that Wilbur is a real rat that it's easy to get careless, so just be careful.

As Wilbur gets older he may find it harder to accept new friends, most likely it would be best to pick a friend that doesn't challenge him too much, perhaps a younger smaller domestic rat and supervise the intros very closely, make sure he gets the message that you have invited the new rat into the house and he's not an invader. A wild rat can easily kill any domestic rat, so the trick is that he shouldn't want to.

There are a lot of myths regarding wild rats, and unfortunately most are true. But the saving grace is that they are pack animals that form super strong social bonds with their families and Wilbur sees you as family. He'll trust you and love you and even protect you. And he'll follow your lead. He might be a little aggressive during play fighting with you, but he won't draw blood. He's going to be fond of the shadows and stay close to cover and he's going to be on the quiet and stealthy side, maybe to the point of being just a little creepy. Our part wild rat loved to lurk in the shadows and stay out of sight. He's also not likely to eat foods the first time you present them. Our girl would taste any new food and not eat any more of it until hours later or the next day. That's the way wild rats avoid poisonous foods. But once she tested a particular food she would be satisfied it was safe she would eat just about everything. And lastly wild rats tend to like order and rules. they like familiar things to happen the same way every time and on time. They like routine more than domestic rats.

You really are lucky you found Wilbur so young, older wild rats are way to dangerous to socialize. Remember all of our domestic rats started out as wild rats long ago. These were rats just like Wilbur that formed special bonds with their humans and from which domestic rats evolved. As long as you remember that Wilbur is special and take certain precautions and give him lots of attention, you are going to have a very rare and wonderful experience with him. Also try and avoid bad advise from folks that never actually owned wild rats and are writing second hand accounts about they think wild rats are like. There's a lot of well-intentioned misinformation out there, like all wild rats need to be neutered... or that they go hormonal or that they can't have domestic rat friends... No two wild rats are going to be exactly alike, but there are way more success stories than horror stories. It's all about building and maintaining that close emotional bond from my personal experience.

Keep us posted on your progress, don't get too frightened if and when Wilbur starts play fighting and don't let strangers or other animals get too close to him and you should be off to a great start.

Best luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I will keep in mind everything u said. A lot of the stuff about being stealthy and jumping is dead on. I am surprised at what he can already climb. I will make sure to introduce my husband slowly thanks for that. I Doubt be will let me buy a rat we will see. The only thing that doesn't sound like to Wilber is the food thing. I give him food and some times be won't eat it so i put my hand in the cage and pet him and suddenly he is chowing down. I will definitely keep u posted thank you so much. gunna go hold him now
 

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Some wild type rats will trust you to show them what good food is, some won't and need to do the test it themselves thing. This always would disappoint my daughter who would give our girl tasty treats she wouldn't eat at first, like cake. But by the next day if any of the cake was left over our rat would pig out. As every wild rat is very different, I don't expect to be spot on, neither will anyone's story necessarily be the same as yours. You are going to have to figure out stuff as you go along. There's a lot of good information out there by other people who have kept wild, half wild and part wild rats and there's a lot of misinformation written mostly by folks that have heard stories. Yes wild rats are usually wired hot and fast to react and never should be surprised, but most aren't aggressive by nature. In fact if raised as family members and friends they usually do very well.

Most of the horror stories involve people that failed to properly socialize their wild children very young. If you don't get your rat properly bonded at an early age, it's often too late later on to fix the relationship you failed to create when you had the chance... I think you've got it right, you built the right bond right from the start and you are most likely to have a truly wonderful experience ahead of you.

I understand about your hubby not getting the two rat thing... but remember rats are pack animals that need almost constant companionship. We did an only rat too, and we took her everywhere, and it can be hard to find restaurants that serve families with rats or stores that let you shop with your rat on your shoulder or to play a family outing to places that allow rats. So a second rat will actually make your life easier in the long run. Rats don't eat much and for the most part where one can live, two can live... Once hubby gets to know Wilbur, I think he'll better understand.
 

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Oh I frickin love his giant ears!

He is so cute and you are his momma so I'm sure he is so bonded with you!
If I were you I would definitely do my best to get him a friend; I adopted a rat that had been kept alone her whole life and even though she loved humans a lot she was pretty boring until I got her friends: in 2 days she was a completely different rat and started acting friendlier than before and she seemed to be smarter and prettier no joking. Rats really need friends since one can not sleep in bed with them, and spend time the whole day with them. Even just one friend would be great for your rat ,though I think that male rats are happier to be introduced to others when they are still young, so I would try to find a male rat that is about his size so no one is in a weak position.
All the best for you and your rat child!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ya I was really thinking about it. I was worried he would hurt the tame rat. But he is pretty mellow. Just skiddish when someone moves. He is getting bigger by the day. I heard you shouldn't get rats at pet stores. I only have one here and town and the next town over has a petco. I don't want to get wilber sick from another rat too. He is so healthy. Any thoughts?
 

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If you only can find rats there I would go ahead and get them there. I mean, if I wanted a rat I wouldn't buy one, but if I had a rescued one that needed a friend and couldn't find any place to adopt them from(or ultimately buy them for a good breeder) I would do it even though it could be unethical, since keeping a lone rat is just as bad.

I would get the rat and quarantine him for at least a week(though 2 or 3 is adviceable) or more if you see any signs of respiratory distress, or sneezes, and if I had the chance maybe even take the new rat for a vet check.

Skipping quarantine is not the best idea in the world but if you feel that waiting 1 or 2 weeks might hurt the chance of the rats getting along, I would go straight for a check with your trusted veterinarian and ask for her professional opinion in the matter, and maybe to make a plan in case any of the rats got sick (like having the meds beforehand?) but any rat I got for your Wilbur would be a male of the same age or just a little younger. Just keep in mind that you should get the second rat as soon as possible so your Wilbur doesn't grow asocial.

Best of lucks and pleeeeasee keep us updated!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ya i agree. I still have to talk to my hubby about it again. The big thing is I live kinda out of the way. there are only two towns within 2 hours or so. Its out on the penisula of washington. so the vets here probably don't know much about rodents and the one i took wilber too didn't have to much to say. she said the smallest animal she has dealt with is a bunny. I will go around and do some research in town today. thanks
 

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That is an awesome story. If you spend that much time with him he should be fine. But like someone has said they are all different. I spent similar amounts of time with my first one but then she started escaping from her cage to come greet me every time I came home so I ended up getting her a friend and they barely needed any introductions they were fast friends. My second one was also pregnant (pet store nightmares) one of the babies now happily lives as a cats bff.
 

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In general, wild rats are extremely hardy compared to domestic hot house rats... We take all of our rats outdoors as young as possible and let them get dirty, for some reason this helps them to grow up healthier... So in part it might be genetic or it might be exposure to nature that makes wild rats almost bulletproof.

The number one issues with domestic rats is mites which are easily treated with revolution in most cases. There's nothing wrong with quarantine but for the most part mites are the most common problem you get from new rats.

As to Wilbur posing a danger to a new domestic rat... he certainly does... He can kill a domestic rat faster than it will know what hit him. I introduced my part wild girl to my domestic on my lap in an easy chair and kept my hands in between. I had about a thousand pinpricks in my hands afterwards from bites I blocked, but neither rat drew blood... It took about an hour an I mashed them into a single fur ball and dropped them into the cage together. My problem was that my domestic rat was so much bigger and she had been an only rat... she kept pushing our wild child around and groomed all the fur off her rump... And for a few weeks our part wild girl just ignored her... until finally one morning there were two holes in our domestic rats throat and the fight was over forever. In all honesty our wild child could have killed our domestic rat at any time... but she didn't, and when she had our domestic rat by the throat she let go having made her point... So actually she exercised remarkable control and patience... two traits not usually attributed to wild rats. I might add that I watched our wild rat actually teach various tricks to our domestic rat after that. I'm not talking copycat, I'm talking actually teach.

So, I might recommend choosing a domestic rat that might be on the smaller side with a very friendly and calm personality, one that isn't likely to threaten Wilbur. Remember, Wilbur is built to survive, he's built to fight and he's built to kill. He's every bit a tiny wolf. But he's also a pack animal and he wants to be loved and have someone to love... So he's a sweetheart because he wants to be, not because he has to be... And that's in part what makes him so very special.

People don't often get when I tell them that our most vicious rat was also our sweetest. It just seems like a contradiction of terms. But when you raise a wild type rat you learn to understand and appreciate what I'm talking about. If you get Wilbur the right friend, he'll be like the best big brother your domestic rat can ever wish for.


The only problem with big box pet stores is they often carry older and larger rats that aren't too well socialized. Bringing home a larger rat with an attitude problem is likely to push Wilbur's buttons. You might be able to find a smaller pup from a snake food breeder, (unethical as heck, but you have a special case)... Spend some time with any rat you are considering adopting to carefully evaluate his personality... it's not that you can't fix and socialize most rats given time, it's just that Wilbur might not be that patient. You need to be able to introduce your new rat as a friend and not an invader, and if the new rat smells like an invader and acts like an invader Wilbur might to into home defense mode and shred him, which is what wild rats do to invaders. If the new rat is friendly and submissive Wilbur is likely to welcome a new friend and family member.

I realize that I might sound overcautious, but anything you do with Wilbur is going to have some risks involved... but so far he sounds really great. Knowing what can go wrong doesn't eliminate the dangers, but it can help you to manage the risks. We didn't even know our rat was part wild when we got her and we got broadsided so we made a few mistakes. Hopefully you can avoid them and have a less stressful experience.

Best luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I went around to every place I could find that knew about rats. I finally found a breeder and we talked for awhile. Him and almost everyone I talked to says he looks pretty attached to me. I don't think I am gunna get another one. I spend like 12 hours a day with him and the more important thing I think is that it doesn't cause problems in my marriage. I have heard from you and alot of other people that every rat is different. and honestly I think he will be ok on his own from that the vet and the breeder and the humane society have told me. He has gone on trips to seattle with me, and goes out on my shoulder (well in my shirt) when i let the chickens out every morning. I noticed sometime he doesn't even care about me he just wants to wonder but when he gets scared he runs straight to me. He likes to sleep behind me if he can. Thanks for all the info again. I keep going back and reading it and mulling it over and comparing. Thanks so much.

Cardboard Technology Machine Carton Electronic device
Wilber's mario looking castle. with Wilber running out of it
 

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If you can really do the 12 hour a day thing with him, he will most likely be fine. Just a heads up though... as my own wife is rat phobic, spending so much time with our only rat actually put more stress on the marriage than a second rat did... My wife actually wound up "liking" the second rat idea because it meant we could go out and eat to restaurants that didn't necessarily admit rats and she could spend more time talking to me and out daughter without standing on a chair or table.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
ya. I don't think that is gunna happen. my husband fishes and is gone half the year. When he is home we pretty much are home bodies. We will still go places but Wilber or not we don't go out much we like to stay home and watch tv and play miniature war games (table top super nerdy stuff) and I used to play WoW. if our marriage could survive that. lol we have been together for 15 years. and I am home all day most days, except errons. Also when i told him I wasn't getting a 2nd rat he was really relieved. I will keep it in mind but i think i am good.
 

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Oddly, Wilbur and you might just be perfect together... It sounds like you both can use the companionship. It will be interesting how Wilbur and hubby hit it off. And in the end, that is likely to impact any second rat decisions. Who knows, maybe hubby will want one of his own.

Sadly, you can't explain rats in words or photos, people have to meet them and get to know them. The word rat instantly kicks the brain into misconception mode. While some folks think Mickey Mouse others think Ben. One of my New Yorker friends had no problem holding our rat, but as soon as someone said the word rat he would cringe... the word rat terrified him, the actual rat didn't. My wife still refers to one of our rats as that "horrible creature" and the other "the more horrible creature".. and that's after 5 years of living with rats... and she's way better than she was when we started... My wife suffered a rat related trauma when she was a child... and she can't get past it, but oddly enough she sees what good pets rats make for our daughter. Most people adjust their preconceptions once they actually get to know a rat up close and personal. In the end, if Wilbur and hubby become friends I don't think hubby will object to another rat friend for Wilbur and you and perhaps himself... If they don't, well let's just say even one rat has it's issues.

I'm actually glad to hear that Wilbur goes outside with you, he's going to benefit from nature. I have a theory that rats are meant to get a little dirty. Our rats go outside and they just about never get sick as opposed to their hothouse counterparts. Rats are designed to live in some pretty nasty places like dank and moldy underground burrows. That's not to say that they shouldn't be kept clean and in sanitary conditions when indoors, just that a bit of exposure to real nature can do them a world of good in building up their immunity.

When our part wild girl started play fighting she could be a bit scary, she liked to leap at my face and mock bite my nose... she was very fast and could lay a dozen mock bites on me before I could swat her off. Naturally she was only playing and never really bit me or broke the skin or hurt me in any way. I'm just wondering... has Wilbur started play fighting with you? Is he playing mock attack and run away yet or hand wrestling with you? I've been told that some 100% wild male rats don't play fight with their humans. I've always wondered if this is because they are more shy around humans or if their humans discourage this more in wild rats... but I'd love to hear your take on it.

Until very recently, certain web sites have strongly discouraged the discussion of wild rats living with humans. I think it's easier for some rat owners just to think that domestic rats and wild rats are too different and they don't want to be associated with wild rats. When I started out with our part wild rat, there was almost no information on the subject available anywhere... other that 'don't do it'. Pretty much everyone forgot, or wanted to forget, that all domestic rats started out with wild ancestors not too long ago and the first pet rats were in fact wild. This has cost our community a great deal of useful information. There is so much about wild rats living with humans that isn't common knowledge anymore. Last year, there was a rat rescue that was keeping half wild rats away from their forever homes until they were old enough to be spayed and neutered. This was a tragic idea... Wild rat need to bond with humans when they are very young, and most never need to be spayed or neutered. They were setting up the potential owners with unsocialized and traumatized sub-adult wild rats. I can't even think about how that was going to go wrong. Those pups needed to be with their forever human parents as soon as they got their eyes open from my own experience. But misconceptions still abound.

By sharing some details of Wilbur's life with the community here, you will be doing a lot of good for future wild rat owners. You can check out the posts by unlikelyfather, who also lived with a wild boy. He hasn't been around in a long time, but he left behind some useful information. Way back when we adopted our part wild girl... had I known she was part wild, I might have passed on her... back then there were very few success stories involving wild rats to be found. It would have been a big mistake. I think many of us know so much more now that we can better care for and cherish our special friends. Whatever you can add to the conversation will be helpful, because your story with Wilbur is part of our history and perhaps an interesting part of our future. Every year hundreds of baby wild rats get turned up like Wilbur did... Some are kicked out of their nests by moms that can't care for them, some crawl off and some get dragged in by cats, but however it happens their future can depend on our better understanding of how best to raise them.

I do look forward to your updates.

And as always, best luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
To answer your question about play fighting he doesn't really play fight too much. sometime if he doesn't want to be picked or he is in a frisky mood he will bite my finger nails. I kinda find that odd cause its the only part of my body he has bit. I think its cause its hard and he doesn't see it as part of me? He tugs on my shirt sleeve but thats cause when he is scared he climbs into my shirt. So when I am just sitting he sometimes wants to get in my shirt but the sleeve is too tight so he tugs. I am learning that getting him to jump in my hand is easier than trying to grab him alot of the time. When I try to grab him and he's roaming he wants to run just a few inches so he isn't picked up but if he is scared and in a spot and I put my hand out he will very willingly jump in.

the breeder I talked to suggested picking a sound to make and always give him food when i do it so if he does get lost he will come to the sounds.

He got out of the cage once when I was playing games downtown. When I got home I was tearing the whole room up only to find him a few feet away under my pillow. When I lifted the pillow he quickly bolted so after more tearing up the room i found him again 6 inches from where I found him the first time. lol it took about 30 secs to get him to jump into my hand cause i couldn't grab him. He was happy to see me and his cage.

I have to move slow if i want him to not run away. You said your girl was a few months old or so? I am pretty sure Wilber was like 10 days old. So he really only knows me. I have put him in other peoples hands a few times cause they REALLY wanted to hold him (both you girls) he was just fine tho he jumped back into my hand about a min later.

Also I can't remember the word the lady at petco used. but she used to work at one of the good vet places around here and she said something sciencey I can't remember like pre-natal or pre-pubecent something or another. Basically she said he will probably think he is human the way I have been handling him and because I nursed him. And everyone who has tried to pet him have done so successfully. He just sniffs them then tries to crawl back into my shirt. lol honestly in general I think girls are feistiest than boys. I know my boy dog, can and rooster are all more likely to run and hide than my girls of the same. I think males in nature have to fend for themselves. So on his own Wilber is more of a scaredy rat than a wrestler type.

I would be glad to keep sharing info. Tho i don't know if the introduction section will get as many views. Where should I make a post for on going updates.

Sorry for any gramar mistakes I try to proof read but I am not good with gramar at all
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
also you said someone cringed from the word rat. which is interesting. at first I didn't want to call him a rat. It seemed to undermine how precious he was so I would call him mouse sometimes. i think my husband used the word mouse at one point to so i see what you mean. now i try to catch myself and call him a good little rat.
 
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