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I have an 8 month old who is not spayed yet, and I was wondering if spaying or nuerting would stop her from going after the other two rats. Also wondering how much it would cost?
 

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i don't know, it might, but i believe neutering is more effective in countering the aggression of males.
you could probably do it anyways, if only for the health benefits! (no uterine tumors or pyometra!)
i think it would cost around $100, but i've never had it done so i'm not sure.
 

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Spaying has great health benefits at any age, and is proven to reduce the risk of mammary tumors as well as increase life expectancy. It won't do a great deal for agression issues, certainly not to the same degree that a neuter would improve a male.

Costs depend greatly on where you live. I know people who's vets will do them for as low as $60, but in my area you're looking at close to $300.
 

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I'm a huge advocate of neutering and spaying :) I have 13 rats, and all are speutered. Personally, I've never had an aggressive female, but I've seen quite a few bullyish girls calm down after they're spayed and their cagemates are altered also. Plus, female rats are very, very prone to mammary tumors (something like 70-85% chance of getting them), and spaying greatly reduces that. As Jellybean mentioned, it would also stop any chances of pyometra (infected uterus, fills with pus and blood) - which is very prominent in intact female rats.

I pay $60 for a spay, but that's on the very low end of normal - spays are usually anywhere from $80-$175 depending on the vet, and the area you live in. You have to find an experienced, rat-savvy vet for the surgery.
 

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Boy, I think I am going to look into spaying my girls.
Is there much risk in the surgery itself? They just seem so small to be going under.
 

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Anytime any animal is put under there is a risk. Risk can be greatly reduced by precautions beforehand. Do not put a rat under anesthesia if it seems ill at all or if you do have your vet run blood work beforehand. It probably is a good idea to run blood work before any surgery actually, especially if it's an elective procedure.

But the best possible thing you could do is to go to a vet that comes recommended by a fellow rat owner/rescue and has done hundreds of spays and neuters. Risk is increased in rats by inexperiance and misconceptions so please do your research.

Questions I would potentially ask my vet before a spay/neuter/surgery:
What anaesthesia do you use?

How many rats have you spayed/neutered? What is the success rate in these surgeries?

Are you comfortable working surgically on such a small delicate animal? Do you work with any rat rescues/breeders I may contact as a reference?

Do you recommend antibiotics and pain killers after surgery? (if the vet says no, run run run! These are a must IMO)

What kind of stitches do you use?

Do you have follow up checks on spays/neuters?

And then it's good to ask how much, and if follow up checks, pain killers and antibiotics are included so you aren't surprised with any additional costs.
 

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Since Carrot was spayed 2 weeks ago, she seems to be slightly more aggressive, although it might just be that she isn't ill anymore and is back to how she was way back when.
 
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