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I have 3 girls. Halley and Rosemary are about ten months old and Cam is about a year. None of them are related, all adopted from rescues; Halley I've had the longest, and I adopted Rosemary and Cam in December 2020 after Halley's sister didn't wake up from a spay.

Cam is a chunky rat and weighs a full 100g more than the other two - she's slightly overweight, but mostly she's just naturally huge. Halley has been underweight since her sister passed, and despite efforts on my part (giving her high calorie treats separate from the other two) she's only gained a small amount. She is easily scared off from food and easily bullied due to skittishness and small size.

Usually this is not a major issue, but over the past week or so, I've noted Halley losing fur over one eye from barbering, hearing lots more squeaking from their cage and always seeing Halley getting pinned down, and seeing Halley get chased and thrown around during playtime instead of them all equally winning or losing play fights. I'm very concerned for her health and don't want her to live in a cage where she's getting bullied a lot. She still cuddles with the other two, she isn't completely terrified, but she's definitely receiving more aggression than before.

I don't want to surrender Halley back to the rescue since I've had her nearly nine months. I have a smaller single-level travel/nursing cage that I can keep her in temporarily, but it's not really a long-term solution. What could be causing this sudden aggression and how do I get the other two to calm down and treat Halley as a playmate instead of a chew toy?
 

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I would suggest using the nursing cage for a while while Hailey recoups and then work through the introduction steps all over again.
 

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Typically its Not recommended to out rats of big age differences together. The reason being is the older rats will become more territorial and not want to share there space with the “outcast” I recommend trying to reintroduce your rats again.. but if you can’t find a permanent solution your best bet may be to get another cage and get a rat around the age of your new baby to keep the, company.
 
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