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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Aside from pet rocks and plants :p this is NOT because I intend on getting another pet- just curious to what people think. I do understand there is no such thing as a true low maintenance pet and that they all have needs, but which are the easiest to fill? (even if it just your personal lowest due to your situation)
For example people tend to say fish but to me its very difficult

Or on the flip side the highest maintenance pet that is still rewarding to you!

Personally my lowest is cats since they blatently demand what they want ;D
 

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Blech, I can't keep plants alive. To me, those are way too high maintenance. XD

Gerbils are very low maintenance. They do best in an aquarium and, depending on the size, it only needs cleaning once a month or so. They of course need feeding and watering daily, and if they are tame enough, it is good to get them out in a playpen every day or so (I can't with mine because they hate me :p). Dust bathes are good to offer semi often as well.
 

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Tarantulas can be pretty low maintenance once you have them all set up.
 

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Snakes are pretty low maintenance. Lizards can go either way depending on if they're live insect eaters or not. I also have a millipede that may qualify as the lowest maintenance pet I've ever had (since I can't bring myself to handle it for some reason...all those legs >.<).
 

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Tarantulas.
Only need food a couple times a month (depending on species and individual appetites). Some substrate, keep them warm and keep the tank relatively moist and they are perfectly fine.
 

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Snakes and my dwarf hamsters... I feed both once a week (the dwarfs get a weeks' worth of food at a time). Snakes also don't smell (unless they have pooped) and you only need to clean their cage 1-2 times a week... Some of mine only eat every 2-3 weeks and will eat once a month as adults. You work a lot on the front end though, getting the temps and humidity right and buying the appropriate heating and housing isn't cheap...But they make great pets with little time commitment and don't need interaction to be happy.
 

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Insects
 

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Had several Emperor and Black Asian scorpions, and apart from feeding them crickets and gelled water every week, it was ridiculously low maintenance. I enjoyed freaking the crap out of my guests with those, my first Emperor was over 8 inches long.
 

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We've had a lot of pets over the years and sometimes I'd say it depends on the individual pet regardless of species.

Lets see we've had-fish, Hamster, mice, cats, chickens, house bunny, rats, ponies, striped possum, sugar glider, skunks, horses, ferrets, mink, squirrels, dogs and then house birds-parakeets, conure and starling.

From easiest to most time consuming listed. I count all things time consuming-feeding, handling, cleaning, walking ect. I don't count financial or health care time cause that just depends on the individual critters health and if an accident has occurred. We have had a lot of farm critters when I was young, but I only counted the layer chickens as pets, because they are with perks. ;)

Currently we are owned by 2 dogs, 15 rats, a conure, starling and 3 chickens. If I counted our current rats as a whole then rats might be higher on the maintenance list, but that is just cause we've got 15 of em. :) Our two dogs are way high maintenance right now but that is due to old age health issues.
 

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My dad has stick insects, which just need a mist of water and some brambles to munch on, which is about as low maintenance as you get I think! Not exactly cuddly though :p it's definitely about lifestyle as well- I live in a fairly small rented flat, so a lot of pets feel like more work because I have space constraints (eg no garden, small rooms, unable to put shelves up etc) whereas if I could buy my own house, I could have a garage and garden space, which makes things just a little bit easier!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Anyone had experience with roaches? :)
I want to ask all of you questions!

To the snake owners- any moral dillemas? Feed frozen or live? Would you ever feed one of your ratties? (I'm kinda assuming it's safe to feed deceased unfrozen rodents, but not really sure)
To owners of.. Non mammal 'insect' type creatures- taranchulas, centipede, stick insects and scorpions- how is care? Do you handle them? Are they fun to watch?

Also I might have to recommend a low maintenance (ish) pet for my aunt (for the children although the adults would care for it) who has it in her head that one cute little rat would be low care... I tried to explain otherwise but I told her a bit about mine and she thinks I'm over indulgent of my babies....
Gerbils, mice? They want cute but are somewhat open to lizard so maybe I can convince for something !else mainstream.. They've had monarch butterflies atcone point but they want to be able to keep it for a bit longer than that?
Edit:they do take very good care of the animals they have, so that is not a concern

@mimsy -I'd love to hear your experience with pet skunks! It's something that I want when I move to a state where that's legal.. Also have you had alpacas?
 

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Gerbils are very low maintence, but not good for small children. They are very fun to watch, though, for all ages. Just as long as the kids don't want to hold them and play with them. Good socialization could make a gerbil friendly, but even so, they are flighty.
 

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Anyone had experience with roaches? :)
I want to ask all of you questions!

To the snake owners- any moral dillemas? Feed frozen or live? Would you ever feed one of your ratties? (I'm kinda assuming it's safe to feed deceased unfrozen rodents, but not really sure)
To owners of.. Non mammal 'insect' type creatures- taranchulas, centipede, stick insects and scorpions- how is care? Do you handle them? Are they fun to watch?

Also I might have to recommend a low maintenance (ish) pet for my aunt (for the children although the adults would care for it) who has it in her head that one cute little rat would be low care... I tried to explain otherwise but I told her a bit about mine and she thinks I'm over indulgent of my babies....
Gerbils, mice? They want cute but are somewhat open to lizard so maybe I can convince for something !else mainstream.. They've had monarch butterflies atcone point but they want to be able to keep it for a bit longer than that?
Edit:they do take very good care of the animals they have, so that is not a concern

@mimsy -I'd love to hear your experience with pet skunks! It's something that I want when I move to a state where that's legal.. Also have you had alpacas?
I raised dubia roaches for my bearded dragon for a while. They're pretty cool little critters and I'd often find myself "playing" with them though I didn't consider them pets. They're about as low maintenance as you get; dog food and some veggies to eat and water crystals and that's about it.

Feeding live animals to snakes is a really bad idea. I'm not sure if you've ever been bitten by a large rat, but it can do a lot of damage and if a rat is fighting for its life...well you can probably imagine. I've heard of rats killing snakes. I feed frozen thawed to my ball python and he's never had a problem with eating.

My only "insect" at the moment is a millipede that I found my dogs harassing in the back yard. I like watching him (on the rare occasion that I catch him moving) but I just can't bring myself to let him crawl on me...something about all those legs lol Kind of odd since nothing usually freaks me out.

As far as a pet for your family members, do they want something hands on or something they could just watch? Mice are good for watching (they're not really as social as rats typically, though they can be friendly with time and effort; my lab mice are friendlier than some of the rescue rats I've taken in lol), gerbils are even better for watching and they have such cool cages for small critters like that. If they want something hands on, maybe a house rabbit? Two rats wouldn't be too terribly hard to take care of (coming from the person who had 11 until recently lol). Either has its caveat whether it's proper diet or housing. I'd be wary of reptiles if they're not super meticulous about their pets (even if they do take good care of them). Leopard geckos are a good starter as long as you can find healthy ones to begin with (not petsmart -_-); I'd stay away from anything high maintenance as far as diet or housing needs for first time reptile owners. Snakes are easy if they can stomach the feeding, but they're another that needs at least a little attention to their housing pretty much on a daily basis. Ball pythons are good, hardy starters, but they can get pretty large.
 

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scorpions- how is care? Do you handle them? Are they fun to watch?
Emperor scorpions are fairly docile and can be handled, I'd usually take mine out and keep him on my shoulder while gaming and such. I got stung a few times in the beginning, which is about like a bee sting. Venom isn't an issue as all Emperors sold as pets are devenomized. They are notorious climbers and even my 8 inch Emperor was an acrobat. Not very fun to watch otherwise, as most of the time they stay in hiding or idle.Black Asian scorpions are MUCH more aggressive and I do not recommend handling and I would not recommend them for first time owners. They look wicked under a blacklight, though, with am amazing turquoise blue glow. Watching them shedding exoskeletons is also quite the experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
@kksrats- that's great info, thanks! She has three dogs and a cat, and her children are toddlers. She wants it for when they are just a 'little older' so I think a just watching would be better as they can be a little rough with the dogs and cats if their mom isn't right there (they are incredibly gentle animals) and I worry that knowing that the rats are so friendly and out of the cage during freerange time that they will want to handle them, and quite potentially accidentally hurt or kill them if unsupervised at some point.
What do you feed the millipede?

@blackzarak that's really cool!
What do you feed your emperor? :)
 

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@blackzarak that's really cool!
What do you feed your emperor?
Crickets, fed with a commercial mixture of high nutrition food whose name eludes me right now. The process is known as gut-loading and the scorpions benefit greatly from ingesting those enriched crickets. Occasionally I liked to mix things up and give them some mealworms as well, which are plentiful in pet stores. You can keep crickets in the same vivarium as the scorpions, or in a different tank. Emperors are very passive to the presence of crickets and only pick them off when they are hungry. Asian Forest Scorpions are a different matter, being much more aggressive than Emperors they would quickly decimate the cricket population even when satiated.

Emperors can be kept in groups with no problems assuming that multiple hiding spots are available. Asian Forests are MUCH more aggressive and they do not play well with cohabitation, it is possible, but there is a risk of cannibalism. Asian Forest scorpions are very similar to Emperors and sometimes are mistakenly sold as such, and rule of thumb, if a scorpion is smaller and behaves more aggressively, it will be a Forest scorpion. Observe the pincers as well, Emperors will have granulated, chitinous pincers while Asian Forest have smoother, less granulated ones.
 

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I honestly find dogs and cats to be more low maintnaince than rats.. Once you train a dog after the first year, you don't really have to put work in. Food and water, everthing else already part of everyday life that you just invclude the dogs in. Ctas only need food water and litter chnages, everything else is everyday life.

With rats you have to feed, water, clean cage, have out time for like three hours instead of a 20 minute walk, you get scratched up like an axe murderer was after you, everything you own gets chewed or peed on.

That's just me though!
 

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Cats. We have gone in holiday for up to two weeks at a time and left them with dry food and water only (they have outside access) and they have been happy and purring on our return. You can't beat that! And super rewarding of course. I love rats but find them (comparatively) very high maintenance.
 
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