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*I recommend you don't read this if reptiles/feeding them makes you uncomfortable*



I was really hoping this virus wasn't going to spread :( It's too bad, my rats don't ever interact with other rats. However, two of my boys I bought a few weeks before the initial outbreak and it's been making me really nervous how close to Massachusetts the virus has gotten.
Does anyone know what this virus could mean for companies that sell frozen thawed rats for reptiles? Is this something that can also be spread to humans/other rats that way?
 

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The CDC has updated as of March 14, but there have been no changes thus far:

Number of laboratory-confirmed recent human cases of Seoul virus: 17
Number of states reporting laboratory-confirmed Seoul virus positive results for humans or rats: 11: CO, GA, IA, IL, MN, MO, PA, SC, TN, UT, WI
States with facilities (for example, homes or premises) currently under investigation: 15: CO, DE, GA, IL, ID, IA, MI, MN, MO, NJ, PA, SC, TN, UT, WI
 

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Does anyone know what this virus could mean for companies that sell frozen thawed rats for reptiles? Is this something that can also be spread to humans/other rats that way?
Yes, there is a risk. A few companies irradiate their mice to eliminate pathogens or viruses. Pumpkinrat- PM me if you need more info.
 

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OK I just read all 13 pages to see what's been said, asked and answered. I was actually tracking all of the ratteries affected and results of testing, and how they were exposed, but then sadly caught that horrendous flu and have been out of commission on my updates for awhile.

I can add some things though to the general information pool though :)

There are 2 types of this SEOV virus being tested for in humans. I cannot remember the actual scientific terms but basically "new" which is a few months old, and "old" which is from the beginning of time to up to that time. Humans get tested for both. Rats get only tested for new as they have a persistent infection. The Canadian breeder who actually posted on her page about her human positive was postive only for the old virus so she wasn't affected during this current outbreak and may have been exposed anytime. There are breeders in Ontario mentioned that have been doing imports and trading with affected ratteries in the US but she's not posting about it at all.

The CDC is doing trace-forward and trace-back to find all the affected people/rats and to try to limit exposure. I don't think they realized how much trading of rats went on, so hopefully eventually they will call SEOV endemic and will call off the witch hunt.

People are more frightened of the states/counties overreactions then the fear of the virus itself now. As Moonkissed said, the response by these individuals is varied and uneven and breeders are being told a lot of stuff one day and then bullied to depopulate the next, being served with Notices etc.

In the UK, they only depopulated ONE rattery before realizing trying to do traceback/forward was going to be too much, and labelled SEOV endemic.

In Canada they are not as concerned about it as in the US either.

The rumor is that at least one of the affected ratteries trapped and used wild rats in their breeding program (and encouraged others to do so as well), and this is likely where it all initiated. It seems IL is state zero still even after all this time. I personally thought it was Utah but nothing is coming out about that anywhere officially, just suppositions by others.

One thing I noticed with my research was that the virus is not a fast mover, nothing like SDA or Sendai...but generally once people are positive, there's going to be rat positives. The ratteries with a lot of positives have had it longer, and the ones who just recently adopted are a lot less likely to have it themselves as exposure time was less.

There is 3 options the CDC suggests if you have rat positives

1) Depopulation (recommended)
2) Quarantine for life (a lot harder than it sounds, with huge biosecurity measures and its likely the rats can never leave your home)
3) Euthanize all positive rats, then retest in 4 weeks at your own expense, euth all positives then retest again, hopefully with no more positives. VERY expensive and some vets are charging fortunes or refuse to do its as the biosecurity protocols involved.
 

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the CDC hasn't updated their seoul page since march 14th, and i haven't read any news articles about people becoming infected since around that time as well. hopefully this thing has been gotten under control.
 

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It is still somewhat ongoing as they are still talking to some breeders but it looks like they are pretty much done with it.

From the CDC/Health Department side it looks like they are not really pursuing it further. I know some states seem to not even care anymore.
It super sucks for those who breeders who lost so much when they are just like eh whatever now :(

But breeders are still dealing with it. Some still are working with them to test or testing on their own. Some are being required to test multiple times so that is still ongoing.


I am reopening since I tested Negative and am not in an affected state but I still know many within those states are still closed and/or testing.



I will say that this does not mean Seoul is poof gone. It just means that it is not quite as big of a deal IMO as they treated it at first.
 

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From the CDC/Health Department side it looks like they are not really pursuing it further. I know some states seem to not even care anymore.
It super sucks for those who breeders who lost so much when they are just like eh whatever now :(
Wow, that's awful. I feel bad for all those who have lost their rats to the CDC's rash behavior. :( I wonder why they were taking such drastic measures then just shrug and move on?!
 

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I actually just talked to my Virology professor about this today. He'd been following it out of curiosity and this is basically what he told me. They haven't completely stopped following it, they just don't want to freak people out more by publishing everything right away, and they have located the major sources so from their standpoint a few breeders with one or two rats that test positive is a lot less concerning. Also, as someone previously mentioned, with it being a "new" strain of virus and with it being the first time pet rats have passed this they really cracked down hard because of the fear of it being an emerging zoonosis virus that could have had the potential to spread fast and far. When it didn't do this and when they were able to relatively easily back-track the sources and take care of it the CDC was less concerned. There will always be viruses and diseases that can be spread via animals, where it's a major concern to the CDC is when it's an unknown or new virus that has the potential to become an epidemic. Yes it's still tragic and awful to breeders and pet owners having to test their rats and potentially euthanize some, but the CDC is only concerned about preventing major spread of disease. It sounds cold, but the reality is they have many viruses and diseases to tack so can't put all their energy into one any longer than necessary. Hope that makes sense! :)
 

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I actually just talked to my Virology professor about this today. He'd been following it out of curiosity and this is basically what he told me. They haven't completely stopped following it, they just don't want to freak people out more by publishing everything right away, and they have located the major sources so from their standpoint a few breeders with one or two rats that test positive is a lot less concerning. Also, as someone previously mentioned, with it being a "new" strain of virus and with it being the first time pet rats have passed this they really cracked down hard because of the fear of it being an emerging zoonosis virus that could have had the potential to spread fast and far. When it didn't do this and when they were able to relatively easily back-track the sources and take care of it the CDC was less concerned. There will always be viruses and diseases that can be spread via animals, where it's a major concern to the CDC is when it's an unknown or new virus that has the potential to become an epidemic. Yes it's still tragic and awful to breeders and pet owners having to test their rats and potentially euthanize some, but the CDC is only concerned about preventing major spread of disease. It sounds cold, but the reality is they have many viruses and diseases to tack so can't put all their energy into one any longer than necessary. Hope that makes sense! :)
Thanks for posting this. This is an important piece for people to understand, and I think you stated it really well.
 

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@ratiesrule , yeah it makes sense that they'd do it that way. Still, I feel bad for the people who were being responsible and bringing their rats forward for testing and ended up losing them.
 

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As of April 25th:

Number of laboratory-confirmed recent human cases of Seoul virus: 17


Number of states reporting laboratory-confirmed Seoul virus positive results for humans or rats: 11: CO, GA, IA, IL, MN, MO, PA, SC, TN, UT, WI
They no longer mention that certain states are under investigation.
 

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I'm jumping in here super late, and I'm only a lurker on this forum. But on a whim tonight, I decided to go to website of the breeder I got my girls from. I opened it only to find a blog post about the virus and the CDC euthanizing all of her animals because she tested positive. She traced this back to an exchange of animals in November. I picked up my third baby from her on November 29th. The infected rats would have never come in /direct/ contact with my girl, and they were likely still in quarantine by the time I picked her up, but obviously things can spread quickly. I don't want to contact the breeder with questions unless it's absolutely necessary - I'm sure she does not want to think about this any more than she has to. Neither I nor anyone who has ever been in contact with my rats has gotten sick, although I know not everyone shows symptoms. But reading through this thread, it looks like the virus itself is less of a big deal than was originally thought? Do I need to do anything? Should I do anything? My mind is just turning like crazy, thinking of my babies parents being euthanized, and the poor, sweet breeder having to go through the loss of all of her rats.... My heart hurts. Any advice would be welcome.
 

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I don't want to contact the breeder with questions unless it's absolutely necessary - I'm sure she does not want to think about this any more than she has to. Neither I nor anyone who has ever been in contact with my rats has gotten sick, although I know not everyone shows symptoms. But reading through this thread, it looks like the virus itself is less of a big deal than was originally thought? Do I need to do anything? Should I do anything? My mind is just turning like crazy, thinking of my babies parents being euthanized, and the poor, sweet breeder having to go through the loss of all of her rats....
I would hope that if there had been any chance of your rat being exposed to the virus, you would have already been contacted about it. I would hope that would've been the case. The timing is really close, though. I totally understand your concerns.

If it were me (just to be sure), I'd send the breeder an email to ask her about the timeline of events just to make sure that the Seoul carrying rats weren't a part of her breeding colony before Nov. 29. Personally, I wouldn't feel bad at all about bringing this up with her. I can't imagine how difficult this experience must have been for her but if she truly cared about her rats, she also cares about your rats. She'll absolutely understand why your asking about it.

If it turns out that there's a chance that your rats came in contact with Seoul, I would probably not bring any new rats home until your current mischief has completely cycled out. This would probably mean that the last rat would be alone, but at least it would prevent any possible continuation of the virus. I'm sure you've already seen the [CDC page](https://www.cdc.gov/hantavirus/outbreaks/seoul-virus/cleaning-up-pet-rodents.html) on disinfecting and disposing of litter and bedding.

Other breeders... your thoughts?
 

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What are the syptoms of this. I'm no where close to their but can't put my rats down or leave them as they get lonely whenever i leave.
Rats are immune and show no symptoms. The only way to know if they carry the virus is to get blood tests. The virus doesn't affect all people but when it does then symptoms can show as fever, headache, back and abdominal pain, chills, nausea, blurred vision, flushing of the face, inflammation/redness of the eyes, rash. Symptoms begin within one to two weeks after contact but rarely up to eight. In rare cases it can lead to HFRS but most infections are moderate or cause mild to no symptoms.
 

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I know that the virus can't be passed from person to person but Do you think it's possible that humans carrying the virus with no symptoms can pass it on to rats? Everyone seems so focused on rats spreading it to us I can't find any information on the other way around.
 

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Discussion Starter #138
Updated states: PA is right next to me :( PA actually had rats testing positive. They are slow to update their info, I'm not sure why.
PA is plain slow, period. I've found this out during 9 years of residence.

PS I posted this article at the time I wasn't coming here and am now amazed both to see it both as a Sticky and that it got so many responses. I so hope it was not a major issue for anyone here (I haven't gone through all the postings yet). And after seeing this article it pretty much dropped out of sight in the news, so I didn't at first realize the severity of the issue. Wishing the best for all of my human and 4-footed friends.
 
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