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Discussion Starter #1
I just want some outside apinions.

I pick my girls up by the tail if I REALLY have to but try not to if I can. If I do pick them up by the tail I get a grip near the base of the tail and it doesn't harm them at all. It upsets them sometimes but no pain is evident.

So I just wan't some outside apinions. And apinions ONLY.

Thanks.
 

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My opinion is that they shouldn't be picked up by the tail. If it causes them discomfort, it's not nice.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Forensic said:
If it causes them discomfort, it's not nice.
True. Picking them up by their skruff is just as discomforting but vets do it all the time. :?
 

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I wouldn't do it personally. It's not comfortable and you risk degloving them. Why risk it if you don't have to? I've NEVER been in a situation where I had to pick them up by the tail. Of course I have very slow squishy manrats.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The degloving is why I (and anyone else with any sense) pick them up at the base where the tail and the ratsy are connected.

Here is an example. Ok this represents the ratsy= ()( ).......... & this is were I'd grab the tail. ()( )..*........ The thickness of the tail and proximity to the body makes it allmost impossible fo the tail to deglove.
 

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Vets use the scruff of the neck, but it's not painful if done right. That's how mamas pick their babies up. Animals have loose neck skin for a reason, you know. It's not painful if done right.

However, picking up by the tail IS painful (they are stressing because it HURTS and they don't like it) and could easily cause a degloving injury even if you are careful. What if they wiggled just right and you slipped, still maintaining pressure? There IS a risk if you're doing it, no matter how safe you think it make be.

There's really no reason to do it. Why not use the scoop method if you're having problems picking them up?
 

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wouldn't it be possible to still do some damage to the bones and tissue and such in the tail? If i had a tail... id be pretty ticked if someone picked me up by it.. :?
 

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In what situations do you pick them up by their tail, Sky?
 

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I would pick a rat up by the tail in a time of emergancy (i.e. the rats life is at risk and its the only way). But I would do it quickly. I would never do it UNLESS it was an emergancy with no other way. Just my two cents.

:)
 

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I had to grab one of my rats by her tail once. She jumped off my lap onto the floor, and bolted. I leaped after her in sort of a baseball slide-to-home fashion and caught her tail, far enough from her body that I'm lucky it didn't cause any injury. I didn't actually lift her up much, sort of pulled her back a bit so I could get my other hand around her body. She was startled enough to freeze instead of struggle. I would only grab their tail in an emergency if there was no other way.

My vet didn't scruff my rat though, at least not while I was watching. She picked him up the same way I do.
 

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If I need to pick mine up, I just scoop my hand under their belly and bring it up.
they don't like to be grabbed from above.
the tail just seems too fragile and uncomfortable to be picked up by.
 

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8O

i'm too afraid to do it because of the possible degloving effect. if its an absolute emergency than ok, but i've never had such an emergency
 

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My vet picks them up by the tail, just the way he was taught and does with all rats. It makes me so mad and sad that I just want to grab the rat back and yell at him, but I should ask him not to before he does but I never get the chance. I also give them treats after for forgiveness. they always seem to accept it. :]]]
 

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i've had to grab some rats by the tail but it was in an emergency situation (my mother's mouser cat snuck in the room during play time and i needed to grab the rats before the cat-having rats used to and accepting of cats is not always a good thing when its the wrong cat in the room and under the bed where you can't reach). but i wouldn't do it for any other reason just because its uncomfortable for the rat. i have read about the degloving before but have had no personal experience with nor read about it on a forum, not to say it doesn't happen of course, merely that i've been lucky not to have to deal with it.

hippy, i'd be cautious of that vet and make sure you verify his diagonis and treatment methods from other sources if i were to use him. degloving is a real issue and CAN happen. not to mention its uncomfortable for the rat. the vet should be concerned for the wellbeing of your rat and that includes its comfort level. there are times of course when putting them through some discomfort is unavoidable but for no reason should they have to be held or picked up by the tail. he could have very well been taught to hold rats like this in school or by another vet and has done it for years without incidence but just because they've done it for a long time doesn't make it right or that something won't go wrong next time. holding rats by their tails is a warning sign for me to look extra close to make sure the vet really does now what they are talking about and their personal habits. some doctors will get in a rut and because tings have worked fine in the past won't explore new options that may be better.

but in any case, suspcions about the vet aside, you should tell them when making the appointment and then again before you hand them the rat or the door even closes not to pick the rat up by the tail as it makes you uncomfortable about it. if asked why you can state the degloving or that it seems to you that the rats are hurt by it but you should be able to say simply that you would rather they just not be picked up by the tail just because. if they don't respect your wishes then its really time to shop for a different vet. even one that is new to rat care but willing to work with you to find the information is better then a vet that does not respect your wishes.
 

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Amen.
 

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Having had a few MIA half wild rats here, I have restrained by the base of the tail until I could get my hands on them, but to lift them by it?...noooo. I have seen a degloving, and besides painful and possible infection setting in, its also very expensive to get that tail amputated. :(

I would be very upset if a vet lifted my rat by the tail and I would definitely tell him not to even before opening the carrier.
 

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lilspaz68 said:
Having had a few MIA half wild rats here, I have restrained by the base of the tail until I could get my hands on them, but to lift them by it?...noooo. I have seen a degloving, and besides painful and possible infection setting in, its also very expensive to get that tail amputated. :(

I would be very upset if a vet lifted my rat by the tail and I would definitely tell him not to even before opening the carrier.
Yes, I think that's as far as I would go, too... restraining by the tail until I could get a proper grip. Even then, it would be a last resort!

As for the vet, hippy, I can't see any reason why you can't request that he pick your rats up in the proper way. You can be polite about it. And if he isn't comfortable picking them up properly, then you could also offer to do it for him. Though, I too would be quite concerned about a vet that wouldn't be prepared to respect a customer's wishes and do what is best for the animal!
 
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