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I have joined this forum because I just aquired a very interesting young rat. She was bought as a feeder rat (don't judge me, my other pets have to eat too and frozen rats die a horrible death, to me live is more humane) ANYWAYS we are calling her Prudance McStubbins, she has no paws on ANY of her legs....just little nubblins where they should be and maybe didn't form...her tail is also not as long as it should be. She is adorable and seems to be a happy little camper. Needless to say, she was kept and not fed to our other pets. I was just wondering how often does this sort of thing happen? Is she going to live a normal little life? Is this genetic or improper breeding?

Thanks for the help and hopefully non judgment! :grin:
 

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Sorry I can't help, but I just want to say that is the cutest name ever lol Hope you find the answers you're seeking :)
 

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I am not totally sure, but I would say it was poor breeding. (Could be wrong so don't quote me on that)

From what I was told (my 2 girls are feeder rescues as well) feeder rats are breed for quantity not quality.

BTW she is awfully cute! Love the name :)
 

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Feeder rats have the unfortunate predisposition for health problems because of their breeding. As mentioned earlier, they are bred for quantity as a food source NOT quality of life. A limited number of them live up to the years that a normal rat can live because of their purpose which makes identifying underlying health issues very difficult. The only thing you can do is know a vet that specializes in small pets. Talk to them before your first vet visit to see if they are comfortable with handling rats as patients. Just because they are trained for small pets doesn't mean they are 100% in the health care of rats.

For example: There is a vet I know who will take small pets as patients but I would not go to her again. She does not care about anything smaller than a cat. My hamster had an abscess that needed treatment and she would only give me a prescription for antibiotics.After asking if she could lance it she told me she did not want to give the time to do so because he was "too old" (7months). A month later when that didnt work, i took him to another vet that I heard only good things about and she removed the abscess, gave me after care instructions and a (more than what was prescribed) amount of antibiotics.

So in the case of your little one, be up on the medical problems that may occur for your McStubbins and be an advocate for her health. Make sure to do health screenings yourself ( check nose, eyes and anus for mucus discharge/ overt redness; listen to breathing to check for clear pathways; etc.) A great resource is Ratguide.com.

I hope the best for you and your little one!
 
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