Rat Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I feel like I need to get my girls spayed because I've heard so many scary things about mammary tumors. But, what are the real benefits to getting them spayed besides that? This is, of course, realizing that the main purpose is to prevent them from having babies. I just have two girls and I really don't plan to bring a male into the mix. I'd like to work with a rescue eventually, but not yet. I'm happy with the two I have. That being said, is spaying still worth it? And what are the other risks? I've heard horror stories from neuters and I know that's a lot less invasive than a spay. Please let me know of your experiences.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,483 Posts
I've never spayed any of my girls before, but I do have three neutered boys. The best thing that I can tell you about spaying and neutering a rat is to have a vet you have researched and you know you trust. The vet I go to for any type of rat surgury lives two hours away from me, but he is always worth the drive. He had neutered four boys for me over the past few years, and they have always made it through happy and healthy. I've even taken Pastoolio to him to have a tumor removed. He's known for performing a lot of surguries on small animals.

I do have quite a few vets in my area, but after seeing some of them I don't think I would want to trust them when it comes to surguries and my rats. The vet I go to for my neuters and tumor removals uses a type of gas anesthesia, and the other ones down were I live all use injections. The reason I don't want to go to them is because rats have really tiny veins, and I'm afraid something might go wrong under injectible anesthesia.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
870 Posts
I had read about spaying reducing the chance of mammary tumors, so I spayed all my girls. My sister didn't feel she could afford to spay hers. All I can offer is the anecdotal evidence that none of my eight girls had any tumors and several if not all my sister's had tumor surgeries - usually more than one and always after they reached 2 years old so that we felt the surgeries were more dangerous for them than spaying at a younger healthier age would have been.

Although I would have spayed/neutered anyway since I wound up with a mixed mischief.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
539 Posts
I believe mammary tumors are driven by estrogen, which is produced in the ovaries/uterus of the female. So, removing those organs pretty much nullifies the risk of getting those tumors; however, they are still susceptible to other kinds of tumors not related to the reproductive organs.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top