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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello, guys. A few of you guys might remember the story of my two rats. The seller assured me I was buying two males. After one month, I was surprised to discover that one of my rats had testicles and the other didn't, which let to separating them.
After that, tehy were kept in different cages until the male (Cornélio) reached adulthood, so I could get him neutered. However, the price to neuter his is as expensive as 300 dolars, which I am definitely not capable of paying for, unfortunatelly. So I decided to buy more rats, so no one was alone.

I just bought from the same seller another rat, a 3 week old one, who's in a separate cage right now. I live with my parents, and it's a total nono to keep the new rat in another room. Therefore, the quarentine is going to be done in the same room where my other rats are in. I have no one willing to keep the new rat while she's in quarentine.

My questions are:
How effective are quarentine done in the same room, even when I'm washing my hands and arms thoroughly after handling the new rats, and how long should a quarentine last.

Thank you.
 

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It isn't that effective. Quarantine only works if they are in a different airspace because a lot of diseases are air born.
 

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Well not strictly true, quarantine in the same room does help with issues that are not airborne. you've got a lot of different transmission vectors for diseases and parasites and different levels of quarantine affect them. I'm not saying that in the same room qurentine is as good as separate airspace. But if you have no choice for some reason, or have already had them in the same airspace a reduced quaretine is better than none (I hate seeing "well I cant do separate airspace quarantine so I might as well not bother")

Here's some different transmission routes
• Air Bourne droplets – this is the most common way viruses travel, particularly viral respiratory infections. Much like the human cold this is caused by tiny droplets from an infectious rat being carried on the air. This can then adhere to surfaces such as clothing or skin and some viruses can stay infectious in that form for up to 3 days. A rat then inhales the droplet and the virus is inside them. You can also pick up this kind of issue from anywhere with infected rats, ranging from your local pet shop, vets, rat show or even visiting a rat friend’s house, transmitting the droplets on your clothing etc., however this is a significantly lower risk than the same airspace.
• Physical / Close Contact – this is particularly true of parasites such as lice. The highest risk is direct contact between rats, so rats sharing the same cage. It can also be a common transmission route for bacterial or fungal infections such as staph or ringworm.
• Secondary Contact – this is where rats have contact with something in recent contact with an infected rat, for example a rat at a show being held by a judge who has just held an infected rat. This is another method of passing parasites across, but can also apply to droplets or skin infections in some cases. It can also apply to bedding / food etc stored unsafely, and is a route where for example parasites can be passed from wild rats to our pets.
• Faecal – Oral – This is where a rat eats another rats (or other infected animals) faeces or something the faeces has been in contact with. This is a typical transmission route for internal parasites and some forms of bacterial / viral infections.
• Bodily Fluids – This is a typical transmission route for sexually transmitted diseases such as genital myco. It can also transmit issues like rat bite fever via infected saliva in a bite wound


Full quarantine to me is separate airspace (so have to go outside before entering another building. To do this effectively you need to also change top layers and ideally shower between handling them and others

The next step is same house, different room accessible by "airlock", so your existing rats are in one room, then there's a closed door, corridor then second door before you get into the room with the new rats in. Add in clothes change and shower and its not perfect but it will minimise the amount of airbourne stuff that gets in there, and so reduce the chance of infection.

The next is same house different room, no airlock, again changing clothes is a good idea. Its unlikely to stop airbourne contaminants but has more chance than lower options

Finally there is same room, different cages (ideally far apart) which is what your doing, including washing hands and changing top layer between groups. This wont do anything against airbourne droplets but it will protect your rats from parasites, and several other transmission routes which shouldn't be sniffed at. Its far from ideal, but better than nothing.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for all the info, guys, this was really helpful. I know I'm not doing the best method, but I'm aware I'm doing everything I possibly can.
Thank you again! xx
 
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