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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So Nike is starting to act like a senior. He's 2 years and 8 months old. He's having a hard time getting around so I moved everything to the bottom level of his cage. He isn't having trouble eating though.

Is there anything I can do to make him anymore comfortable? He's not as steady on his feet anymore and he definitely struggles getting around and holding his food when he eats.
 

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Obviously, keep him well fed and watered and help him out in getting around by carrying him as much as possible... Mostly keep him engaged and mentally active. Rats, and possibly humans have the ability to kind of let go when they feel their useful time has passed... We've had rats go both ways, those who were less attached and had become reclusive, tended to just slip away fast, those who felt they had important jobs in our family and responsibilities tended to hang on way longer than they should have.

It's sort of strange how older or sickly rats will tend to "detach" and become introverted quite a while before they actually pass away. Maybe it's normal, but if you make the extra effort to keep them involved in your every day activities they tend to keep perking up...

Fuzzy Rat lived long beyond what would be expected, she was only about 6 oz of rat and about 22 oz of tumors... But she felt she was a very important rat. In fact she was a big part of our family. On her last day, she dragged herself behind my desk, it took her nearly six hours, to slice my phone cord one last time, she wanted to look out the window for a while to make sure her yard was in good order, she preened my lips, ate some of her favorite foods and hung in there until my daughter said good night to her... I suppose she felt her work was done and she just let go... Max on the other hand had much smaller tumors, but she secreted herself for a couple of months before she passed away, rarely coming out for anything and then one day she just flopped out of her cabinet at bed time and went down hill very fast from there... In all reality she had pretty much left us long before she died... In fact she only lived about a year and a half.

I don't know if that helps, but it's the best advise I can give...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Obviously, keep him well fed and watered and help him out in getting around by carrying him as much as possible... Mostly keep him engaged and mentally active. Rats, and possibly humans have the ability to kind of let go when they feel their useful time has passed... We've had rats go both ways, those who were less attached and had become reclusive, tended to just slip away fast, those who felt they had important jobs in our family and responsibilities tended to hang on way longer than they should have.

It's sort of strange how older or sickly rats will tend to "detach" and become introverted quite a while before they actually pass away. Maybe it's normal, but if you make the extra effort to keep them involved in your every day activities they tend to keep perking up...

Fuzzy Rat lived long beyond what would be expected, she was only about 6 oz of rat and about 22 oz of tumors... But she felt she was a very important rat. In fact she was a big part of our family. On her last day, she dragged herself behind my desk, it took her nearly six hours, to slice my phone cord one last time, she wanted to look out the window for a while to make sure her yard was in good order, she preened my lips, ate some of her favorite foods and hung in there until my daughter said good night to her... I suppose she felt her work was done and she just let go... Max on the other hand had much smaller tumors, but she secreted herself for a couple of months before she passed away, rarely coming out for anything and then one day she just flopped out of her cabinet at bed time and went down hill very fast from there... In all reality she had pretty much left us long before she died... In fact she only lived about a year and a half.

I don't know if that helps, but it's the best advise I can give...

Yes thank you for the advice. I've noticed Nike is getting more detached. All he wants to do when he is out with me is sleep. Although, a couple of nights ago he laid next to me, which is great!
 

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Id recommend checking his urine for protien, this can be done using human multi reagent strips, very handy to have in. Many of the signs of ageing in rats are kidney degeneration and Hld ( often in combo) and if you can track it down you can improve it.

I'd also recommend looking at an oldie friendly protection diet. There's info here http://www.isamurats.co.uk/feeding-for-old-age.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Id recommend checking his urine for protien, this can be done using human multi reagent strips, very handy to have in. Many of the signs of ageing in rats are kidney degeneration and Hld ( often in combo) and if you can track it down you can improve it.

I'd also recommend looking at an oldie friendly protection diet. There's info here http://www.isamurats.co.uk/feeding-for-old-age.html
Oh thank you! I will definitely be doing these things :)
 
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