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Roxy, almost 2 years old, may have had a stroke. I've been gone and my friend was watching the rats so they were okay this morning at 11, but by the time I got home at around 4:30 Roxy was laying in a hammock not moving. I thought she was dying, she was completely limp, but I fed her some water mixed with sugar and a little salt (a recipe my mom found online somewhere) and she seemed slightly better. I have since fed her some sweet potato baby food and she slept a little and is now moving more. Her eyes were all coated with fluid from pituitary stressed secretions or something when I got home. She's walking a little, has scratched her head and clean her face somewhat. Has anyone experienced this? How can I help her? Our vet is out of town and I'm not sure how long this will take or if she might make a full recovery.
 

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I currently have a boy right now with the same issue. We are also pretty sure it was a stroke. He's about the same age as yours. Went from being in exceptional health, to being about how you described very quickly. We're holding to the hope that he will recover at least somewhat, so he's getting around the clock care, until he can either eat/drink on his own, or he passes away. If it was a stroke, there is a chance for recovery, but can take a few weeks.

We're feeding him anything he can/will eat. He already lost more weight than I'm comfortable with, so he's going on Nutrical today. So far we've been feeding him baby food from a syringe, as much as he'll take at a time, before he gets exhausted and goes limp, and has to take another nap. Exhaustion comes on very fast and strong, so we want to get more calories into him in the time he's awake. (as of yesterday, weight was on the upswing)

Make sure she's staying hydrated. To check, pinch or 'tent' the skin at the nape of the neck, then release. If it stays tented up, she's dehydrated, and needs more water. If it snaps back, she's hydrated. Mine is currently having a hard time drinking water out of the syringe, he ends up dribbling and getting a bit wet, so we're mixing in a tiny bit of water with the baby food sometimes, as well as a little bit of olive oil for extra calories.

You'll have to keep her clean like the tiniest baby. Warm water works best for the porphyrin (cool water does next to nothing). If it's really caked, you might have to get a little bit a session at a time. Make sure you wash her arms and chin, too, and chest if she dribbles when she eats. Make sure you dry as well as you can, while being very gentle, as those parts don't dry very well on their own. Don't use the faucet (don't want undue stress). Use a soft cloth or paper towels.

Keep her in a smaller cage where you can change out the bedding any time it's wet or soiled. We have mine in a large 'critter keeper', on a thick mat of paper towels, covered with fleece, and he's in whatever room we are, close by. If she pees, you want to get it off of her as soon as possible. With my boy, he still tries to move around somewhere if he needs to go potty, so when he moves around, we generally know we're going to have a cleanup soon. If it's on her belly, make sure to clean that up, too. And her butt. Those areas get not only stinky, but very uncomfortable if not kept clean.

Make sure she stays warm, but not too warm. When she gets exhausted, give her a nice dark place to rest.
 
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