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Hi!

I was reading some of the other posts about spaying females and I am wondering what you all think / have done yourselves with your females...

I read in one thread that without being spayed, females are more likely to develop mammory tumors and get vaginal infections! Is this true?? Or was the author a vet trying to stir up business? (j/k...sort of LOL)

Anyway, what do you all think is best??

Thanks!!
 

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i've read here as welll as other sources sayin it is defineitly a good thing to do to the femal.

I'm bringin my girls to the vet tomorow to discuss spayin with him. hopefully my girls will be by the end of the week/
 

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your vet was more than likely right! i would recommend it. i haven't had it done to my rat because i was unaware when i got her that they could do that. now i'm afraid she's developing a mammary tumor. it's just a good move for the rats health i think!
 

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I have 12 spayed girls here now. Ranging from in ages from 13 to 18 months. I have a lot more older girls who weren't spayed and they all developed tumours. Spaying helps with hormonally driven tumours like mammary tumours and pituitary tumours (not malignant), as well as uterine infections, pyometra, etc. and of course prevention of pregnancy.

A friend of mine has been spaying ALL her females (rescues at all ages) and from her records (which are to be published on a very well-known informative rat website) it seems spaying at any age is still beneficial. A lot of people think that if you don't spay at/before 6 months there's no point. Well, thats the optimum time but the benefits decrease very slowly after that age. We have noticed that even if a female gets a tumour that it develops more slowly. She has had rats spayed at almost a year later. :)

Just a thought.
 

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Females that aren't spayed have an 80% chance of developing mammary cancer. Females that are spayed only have a 10% chance of developing tumours. Mine just got spayed today. She isn't very happy right now... she's not moving around much.
 

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STUgirl55 said:
Females that aren't spayed have an 80% chance of developing mammary cancer. Females that are spayed only have a 10% chance of developing tumours. Mine just got spayed today. She isn't very happy right now... she's not moving around much.

Do you have pain meds for once the pain meds during the surgery wear off? Spays need pain meds if not abs too.

They are often quiet and sleepy their first night...I think part of it is the anesthesia.
 

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Yea, she was just tired. She slept most of the day away. She's her old self now (except for the shaved belly, lol), back on her feet and peppy. I can't wait to reintroduce her to her sons, but since they can be little scrappers I want to give her a little more time to heal.
 
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