Rat Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a newbie to this forum and more ignorant than I thought about rats and their care. My rat is in the veterinarians office right now having a mammory tumor removed (benign) .

Does anyone know of advice for aftercare. We love her.

I found out at that time, that rats of her type only have about a 3 year lifespan, which makes me sad.

I had a rat who lived to 10 and grew to the size of a house cat. Apparently we have a different breed/species .

Does anyone know what I might have had?

Also we have another rat purchased at the same time as the other, is there anything we can do to avoid her from the same condition?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,160 Posts
rats don't live to be 10, at best they will live to be 3 & on very rare occasions they might go further but the typical pet store rat will live approximately 2 to 3 yrs

unless I see a pic I couldn't guess but even the Gambian Pouch Rat doesn't live to be ten. They live to be 6 to 8 yrs old

***edited to add this link to an animated gif
http://www.80stoysale.com/images/stormydance.gif

BTW... they aren't legal to have in the US anymore so if you have one of these awesome creatures.... MUMMMs the word... shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,535 Posts
Spaying definitely lowers the risk of mammary tumors.

House cat sized rats do smack of Gambians, though the lifespan would be quite long.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,755 Posts
spaying will reduce the risk of a hormonal tumor which is what most tumors are on females. the age of the rat when you have it done will dictate how great a reduced risk that is. though having it done at nearly any time in their lives will reduce the risk somewhat. the rule though is, the earlier the spay the greater the health benefits. your vet will be able to tell you how much the decreased risk will be if you can give him an approximate age of your rat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
First of all I'd like to thank you for your help and advice.

I've heard contradictory advice on spaying here
http://www.ratbehavior.org/PregnancyAndMammaryTumors.htm

Is this unfounded?

Also what should I feed her (aside from her usual food and treats) when she comes home

The Gambian rat thing sound interesting but unfortunatly won't load on my computer. I tried 3 times
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
PS My rat was a few weeks old when I bought her I'd guess and we've had her since last Dec. so I'd say about a year
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,535 Posts
spanky said:
First of all I'd like to thank you for your help and advice.

I've heard contradictory advice on spaying here
http://www.ratbehavior.org/PregnancyAndMammaryTumors.htm

Is this unfounded?

Also what should I feed her (aside from her usual food and treats) when she comes home

The Gambian rat thing sound interesting but unfortunatly won't load on my computer. I tried 3 times
The pregnancy thing deals with hormones and milk production.

Spaying is more effective than pregnancy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
spanky said:
I am a newbie to this forum and more ignorant than I thought about rats and their care. My rat is in the veterinarians office right now having a mammory tumor removed (benign) .

Does anyone know of advice for aftercare. We love her.

I found out at that time, that rats of her type only have about a 3 year lifespan, which makes me sad.

I had a rat who lived to 10 and grew to the size of a house cat. Apparently we have a different breed/species .

Does anyone know what I might have had?

Also we have another rat purchased at the same time as the other, is there anything we can do to avoid her from the same condition?

As far as aftercare I'd be sure the vet provided pain meds and antibiotics after surgery. Watch her carefully to be sure she doesn't worry any stitches and keep her warm and well hydrated and all that. Also be sure to keep the cage extra clean to make sure the surgical site doesn't get infected.

There aren't different breeds of domestic rats. All domestic rats are the domesticated breed of Rattus norvegicus (the brown rat). They have an average life span of about two to two and a half years of age. That is about average, but it is possible for them to live a little bit longer (some reach three and possibly even four).

I find it very difficult to believe a domestic rat of yours lived to ten and got to the size of a house cat. As others have said, could it possibly have been a Gambian Pouched Rat? I know they are illegal in most places... and ten would really have been pushing it even for them.

As far as preventing mammary tumors your best bet is a spay. You can find more info on that here: http://www.petinfopackets.com/rats/rathealth.html#spayneuter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,509 Posts
My vet told me that he had a rat that lived to 7 or 8 (I'm not sure on the truth, just telling you what I was told) and that it's dependant on the genetics of the rats.

Apparently, there are 'pet rat' gene lines that live longer than the popular 'rubbish bin/pet shop' genes that have been so commonly interbred with most pet rats, even those purchased from breeders.

Again, this is what I've been told - I don't know the facts. Just thought I'd throw it in there
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,160 Posts
unlikely


The Guiness Book of World Records lists the record rat lifespan at 7 years 4 months

(not so sure if I would bet real money on Guiness being the most factual resource)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,509 Posts
I didn't know how credable it was, I've always assumed the "rats will live 2 to 3 years and any more is a blessing to be cherished" rule.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
532 Posts
i have had two betta fish hit the 5 year mark, Pretty and Paddles :D and Paddles is still going strong! *knock on wood* they were both rescued from WalMart, but I keep them in 10 gallon tanks with full heating/filtration systems, which is a lot more than most people give a $3 betta fish.

so, i guess the whole point of me posting that is to show that with excellent care, even short-lived pets can live a lot longer than one would expect. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,755 Posts
its not always the treatment though. i've known a rat live in a overcrowed, undercleaned cage, on pine bedding, with pine urine soaked shelves being fed cheap hamster seed mix. he lived to be almost 6. 3 of his sons lived to be 4 in those conditions. a daughter of his, in a small hamster cage under the same treatment but alone also lived to 4. can you imagine if those rats had had proper care? had vet care even once? had the proper food?

i know the chances of that is very rare and i was so mad at the person for keeping these rats in just horrid conditions but sometimes its really a matter of a windfall of chance genetics. of course proper care and attention will help prolong any natural lifespan.

yet, even with the best possible care the average is still only 2-3 years. you can do everything right but the genetics just aren't helping you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Was finally able to open that video. Those rats looked a lot more like the one I used to have than the ones I have now. The ones I have now are Norwegian
rats. My little girl had her surgery successfully and will be coming home today.
Why did they make Gambian rats illegal?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,755 Posts
they haven't been domesticated long enough and are foreign to north america. in some places bunnies and ferrets are illegal because they are foreign to the land. if they were to get loose or their owners were to abandon them then they could cause havoc with the ecosystem balance of the area. i believe this happened in austriala with dingos and rabbits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,160 Posts
from that article:

Wildlife officials have now begun to bait 1,000 rat-busting traps with peanut butter, almond extract, anise, and less appetising toxic zinc phosphide, hoping the animals will take a final meal and crawl off into their burrows to die.

But while Florida may soon be free of the Gambian pouched rat menace, it has other threats to face. In mid-April, officials captured an 8-foot (2.4-metre) Burmese python in a Key Largo state park, which had dined on two of around 500 remaining Key Largo wood rats - an endangered species.


I find this to be a bit harsh " hoping the animals will take a final meal and crawl off into their burrows to die" & considering the damage that the released reptiles are causing... I also feel they are targeting the wrong animals with these bans. They say menace but I think they have truly overlooked the real menace that threatens the area.

I live in Florida, I'm a sixth generation native. I've captured & surrendered non-indigenous snakes & reptiles when I have found them close to home. I've had to chase iguanas off my porch (nearly impossible to catch) & out of places of business I have worked at. We had one fiasco where a 4 1/2 foot iguana entered our store from the loading docks & then slipped out onto the sales floor where dozens of customers ran shrieking from the store after the darn thing hissed & swatted at them. It took myself & 4 other team members not freaked out by this angry beast over 2 hours to catch, not to mention the hundreds of dollars in merchandise that was destroyed in the process.... yup, you guessed it... the crazy thing was found in the glassware department of the home decor store I managed.

Did anyone ever see the picture of the snake eating the alligator? This too was an animal that was once on the endangered species list. There are far less fierce animals than the alligator that live in the fragile ecosystem of the Everglades... can you imagine the unknown damage that is happening right now because of the reptiles that are not indigenous to this state, this country, that are running amok eating up animals, animals as fierce as an alligator? The mild creatures surely have no defense to them if these snakes & other reptiles are capable of taking down an alligator.

Really sad

(sorry, I know its off topic but this hits very close to home for me)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,195 Posts
Wow, that was a great movie! Good for those rats, what a great solution for land mines.

I've always heard about 2 to 3 years for rats, too. Betta fish, though, can very commonly live to five or six years with good care, though for most people 3 to 4 is more common. So I'm not sure a five year betta is a good analogy to an 8 year old fancy rat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,195 Posts
Er, not movie. Story, film clip, I guess I should say. People need to figure out that animals are just better than us at some things, like smelling, and it's great that they've figured out how to humanely use those talents.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top